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THE JUNIOR AND SENIOR CLASSES OF 

ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

PRESENT THEIR ANNUAL 



"THE PINE KNOT" 




NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FOUR 



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As an expression of the appreciation 

felt by the students of 

ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE 

this volume of 

"THE PINE KNOT" 

is respectfully dedicated to 

CHARLES CROSSFIELD WARE 

whose enthusiasm and untiring service 

have placed this institution on a higher level 

and enabled it to serve more perfectly 

the students of the Carolinas. 



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PI /O: ENTLE READER, on the follow- 

ssi ^"^ ing pages of "The Pine Knot" 

of 1924 we have attempted to convey 

m some essence of the guiding spirit at 

A. C. College and to portray to you as 

simply and as entertainingly as pos- 

g|| sible the deeds of our student days. 

rrj If you are pleased with the result of 

>!' our labors, and if, in after years, this 

III book may serve to recall the infinite 

yj value of school life, we shall not feel 

that our work has been in vain. 

|H C. Bonner Jefferson 

|8| Editor-in-Chief. 



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Book I 
THE COLLEGE 

Book II 

CLASSES 

Book III 
SPECIALS 

Book IV 
ACTIVITIES 

Book V 
VIEWS 



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Historical Sketch 



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' f^L HE fifty-seventh North Carolina Christian Missionary Convention met at 
VJ Kinston, N. C, October 30, to November 2, 1901. The Committee on 
Education, consisting of D. W. Davis, B. H. Melton, W. J. Grumpier, E. A. 
Moye, and Dr. H. D. Harper, made a favorable report for the purchase of Kinsey 
Seminary, in Wilson, N. C, from the Wilson Educational Association. Accord- 
ing to the report of this committee, which was duly adopted, the Board of Managers 
of the N. C. C. M. C. were to act as agents of the Convention in acquiring this 
college property, and were to appoint four trustees to have immediate supervision 
of the college. The institution was named Atlantic Christian College and incor- 
porated May 1, 1902. Mr. George Hackney, of Wilson, N. C, was made Treasurer 
of the College, and about $4,000 was contributed the first year. The building was 
taxed to its utmost capacity with students at the college opening in September, 1902. 
The college property was bonded for the original indebtedness of about $11,000 
in 1902, which was fully paid in 1911. The payment of this debt made accessible 
the "¥. N. and Orpah Hackney Memorial Fund," which was bequeathed "for the 
education of worthy young men and women," and which consisted of real estate 
in Wilson to the value of about $3,000. In 1911 there was built a modern brick 
dormitory for men, on the campus, at an expense of about $15,000. In 1914 
there was acquired a 672-acre farm in Onslow County, two miles south of Jackson- 
ville, N. C. The Carolina Enlargement Campaign in the summer of 1920 yielded 
the college for endowment in cash and good pledges, $156,677.70. 

The following have presided over the institution: J. C. Coggins, 1902-1904; 
J. J. Harper, 1904-1907; J. C. Caldwell, 1907-1916; R. A. Smith, 1916-1920; 
H. S. Hilley, 1920—. 



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Terms Expire 1924 

George Hackney Wilson, N. C. 

Claude Riser Greensboro, X. C. 

J. F. Taylor Kinston, X. C. 

W. C. Manning Williamston, X. C. 

L. J. Chapman Griffon, X. C. 

W. A. Davis Washington, X G. 

Dr. C. S. Eagles Wilson, N. C. 

W. B. Turner iiken, S. C. 

Terms Expire 1925 

N. J. House Kinston, X. 0. 

J. E. Stuart Wilson, X. C. 

H. Galt Braxton Kinston, N. C. 

G. T. Gardner Grifton, X. C. 

W. E. Hooker Greenville, N. C. 

W. H. Brunson Ayden, X. C. 

C. B. Mashburx Charlotte, X. C. 

B. B. Kirkland Columbia, S. C. 

Terms Expire 1926 

E. C. Hillyer Raleigh, X. C. 

J. W. Hikes Rocky Mount, X. C. 

W. E. Stubbs Wilson, N.. C. 

C. W. Howard Kinston, X. C. 

A. J. Moye Farmville, X. C. 

C. V. Cannon Ayden, X. 0. 

W. E. Proctor Grimesland, X . C. 

J. C. Richardson Garnet, S. C. 

Honorary Trustee for Life 
Col. S. B. Taylor Catherine Lake, X. C. 

College Physician 
Dr. G. E. Bell Wilson, X. C. 






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MRS. HOWARD HILLEY 






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PRESIDENT HOWARD STEVENS H1LLEY 



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Howard Stevens Hilleu 

"■■PCOWARD S. HILLEY came to the presidency of Atlantic Christian Col- 

J £ lege in 1020. lie was at that time the youngest College President in the 

State. With the natural energy and enthusiasm of youth he brought also to 
his work foresight and judgment beyond his years. He has made the college 
work his work, the college interest his interest, and with the spirit of "this one 
thing I do" he has applied himself to the task to which he was called. 

The students find in him a wise counselor, just in his judgments, and withal 
kind. With true devotion to a cause which lies on his heart, he plans and works 
with untiring zeal, looking steadfastly toward the fruition of his hopes for A. C. C. 
And yet, there is no thought or complaint of self sacrifice. President Hilley works 
for Atlantic Christian College because he loves it, and believes in it. 

His executive ability, his boundless energy, his faith in humanity, and above all, 
his consecration, have preeminently fitted him for this work, ruder his admin- 
istration the College has grown, not only in numbers, but in the interest and in 
the hearts of Disciples of the Old North State. 



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PROF. OF RELIGIOUS EOUCKrfON 



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ATHLETIC DIRECTOR 



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The Colleqe in the Pines 






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KB V HERE the west is all aglow, as the sun is sinking low, 

\s\s Where lit* early morning tingles sharp and fine; 
Where the sweet pine-laden breeze amies gently through the trees- 
That's the campus of the College in the Pines. 

There is laughter in the air of young voices free from care. 
There is shouting when the home team's on the line; 

There are sober faces too when there's something real to do 
At our varsity — the College in the Pirns. 

There's a mental vista here thai grows brighter year by year, 

There's an atmosphere that isn't in the clime; 
There's a lugging al the sunt to reach a higher goal — 

That's the spirit of the College in the Tims. 



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IX May, 1927, Atlantic Christian College will have reached its twenty-fifth 
year of service. Let us consider the college as it is today and ask what 
changes we trust will have been made by its twenty-fifth birthday. 

Let us admit frankly our present lack of many things which should be secured. 
In spite of the money that has been expended in improvements about the buildings 
and for library and laboratory equipment, we still feel the insufficiency of our 
equipment in these respects. 

In spite of the enlarged support in the way of college students and in the way 
of maintenance we still feel keenly the need of a larger student body and of greater 
support in the way of money and students. 

In view of these facts let us state our ideal for the year 1927: First, a new 
location containing at least fifty or sixty acres with ample room not only for 
the college proper and athletic grounds, but also providing room for expansion. 
On this location there must be erected two dormitories each housing one hundred 
students, and an administration building for classes and office purposes, a central 
heating plant, and a gymnasium. This arrangement should be made with some 
view to artistic design and architectural beauty. 

Behind this external equipment there must be the united body of the Disciples 
of Christ, led by the preachers of the two Carolinas. Any program in the state 
that does not take the ministers into consideration and regard their help as essen- 
tial will fall short of our purpose. 

This backing on the part of the church would be shown in two ways: 

First: — A student body of two hundred ami fifty. 

Second: — An increased maintenance budget fur the college. This maintenance 
fund from the church should reach twenty-five thousand dollars a year, which, 
with a $500,000 endowment would put the college in safety if period of depression 
should come. 

The immediate steps in this program demand: 

First: — Addition of fifty students a year to our present enrollment for the next 
three years. 

Second: — Loyal support of Atlantic Christian College Development Campaign 
which will be put on in a short time. 

Third: — Contribution from our people in the state to the endowment and main- 
tenance funds of the College. 

To such a program we summon the alumni, the constituency, the present students 
of Atlantic Christian College with all friends of Christian education in every place. 



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HOWARD HILLEY, JR. 

Senior Class Sponsor 



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W. Otto Henderson 
Falkville, Alabama 

Otto, one of our best beloved - omrades. ha ils 
f om the sunny South. No student on the campus 
is more respected than Otto Henderson. He is 
a man of integrity and fine ideals. He is the 
possessor of a bright and sunny disposition which 
inspires us with optimism. We have all learned 
to love him. Otto has already proved his ability 
as a minister, for the news comes from the 
churches he serves: "We want him to continue 
with us." If pluck and perseverence will win, 
then Otto's victory is fissured. 
"A man who never whines 

Or talks of 'fair' or 'luck'; 
}iut ever works and fights, 

An I smiles and wins — through pluck" 



Lucbetia Henderson 

Ayden, N. C. 

Cheerful, winsome, yet reliant, Mrs. Henderson 
has entrenched herself in the hearts of many peo- 
ple at A. C. C. The quiet courage with which she 
has faced the problems of her s hool life, and the 
indomitable will she lias shown in overcoming 
what to most of us would have been insuperable 
obstacles, win our deep admiration, In spite of 
her home cares she is ever ready to respond to 
the call of another's need. As a student she is 
far above the average. She truly loves books 
and the things of the intellectual life. From her 
we learn the lesson : 

"They can vim think they can." 



[Page Twenty-nine] 



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Clyde Bonner Jefferson 
Washington, N. C. 

Time was when young romantic lovers wooed 
and won their ladies by singing 'neath their win- 
dows. It is a good tiling that Bonner, better 
known as "Google," did not live in those days, 
for methinks he would have spent many sleepless 
nights. Reckless, genial, carefree, democratic, 
and yet, with a spirit that never says die — popular, 
that's Bonner! 

During the four years he has been at A. C. C. 
he has won the friendship of faculty and students. 
He believes in hard work but not to the extent 
that it will interfere with social affairs. Bonner 
has taken part in all the college activities for 
four long years. A host of staunch friends are 
expecting him to be a "star" in the singing 
world of tomorrow. 

"A key that will unlock the fairest heart." 



Annie Elizabeth Etheridge 
Kenbridge, Va. 

We venture to say that Elizabeth Etheridge is 
one of the most efficient students on the campus. 
Tn the varied activities of our college life, social, 
religious, and academic, Elizabeth generally takes 
a leading part. In her studies also she excels. 
Last year she won the Faculty Loving Cup for 
being the "best all-round student." 

Elizabeth has a heart of gold. In her we find 
that which is good and noble. She is loved and 
admired by all, especially by one from Farm- 
ville. We are predicting for her a life of happi- 
ness and success. We drink to you, Elizabeth, 
with all the health within the cup. 

"Her smiles show her happiness. 
Her friends, her popularity." 



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[Page Thirty] 




WlLLIA F. LUSBY 

Grayson, Ky. 

Willia, coming all the way from Grayson, 
Kentucky, is one of our "furriners." She entered 
the Senior Class as a stranger, but one of her 
pleasing personality could not long remain ;-o. 
Very soon she won the favor of both students 
and teachers. She has many of the qualities of 
a leader in student affairs. The offices of re- 
sponsible y which have been given her have been 
ably and faithfully filled. How fortunate we are 
that she came. 

"A black-haired loved one, graceful and tall; 

Gleeful, ah! filled irith fun, and lured by all" 



John W. Humphreys 

Wilson, N. C. 

John, one of our promising young preachers, 
has been with us two years. Already a man with 
practical experience in the business world, he 
brought to his college work more definite pur- 
poses and matured judgment than most students 
possess. A very favored man is John. He is 
one of the "intellectuals" of the class. Last year 
he won the scholarship cup. This year he bids 
fair to win it anain. In the class recitations, 
our professors, disappointed with answers re- 
ceived from the others, turn always confidently to 
John with "Mr. Humphreys, can you tell us ?" 
and Mr. Humphreys usually can. Determination 
is stamped upon John's face. No one who knows 
him can doubt the earnestness of his purpose or 
his ability to realize his ambitions. He >* a quiet 
man, always pleasant and affable, and one who 
attends strictly to his own business. 
"This one thing I do." 



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Milton J. Move 
Parmville, N. C. 



Mi Hon came to us four years ago from Parm- 
ville, a typical Fresh man, but by a process of 
ripening lie has become a favorite fruit of faculty 
and student body. Milton is a young man of dig- 
nity (Witness the uprightness of his carriagel), 
sensitive in temperament, and serious of purpose. 
Nevertheless, lie is very fond of society. It" is 
said that he never misses a social, reception, or 
"date-night." He has been an ardent supporter 
of all college activities and a participator in many 
of them. He has many friends who wish him 
well as he leaves college. 

"Well, he it dusktime or noontime, 
I ask but one .small boon, Time" 



Awik Ruth Jones 

GUIMKSI.AMl, N. C. 

When Annie Ruth came to A. C. C. she brought 
with her ;i mi Tiny smile and happy disposition 
which helped to cheer up and make bright all 
the dark corners Her quiet, gentle, unselfish 
influence lias won her the name of peacemaker 
of the class. She has been a diligent student, yet 
not a bookworm. She has found time throughout 
her college career for the religious, social, and 
literary activities of the school. The class of '24 
is proud to have Annie Ruth as one of its mem- 
bers, and as our ways separate, "Here's hoping" 
that she may choose the path which will bring 
her the greatest happiness. 

' ' For sit e is fes' the q a let k In d 

Whose natur's never vary, 

Like streams that keep a .summer mind 

S a it ir I, id in Jenaoary . ' ' 









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Archie Leo Reel 

Arapahoe, N. C. 

Archie, our representative from Arapahoe, 
Pamlico County, has been with us for four years. 
In this time he has made a lasting impression upon 
members of the student body and faculty. Among 
the students he shows no partiality, but is a friend 
to all — always genial, jolly, and generous. Archie 
is four-square to every wind that blows. He's 
a boy of strong convictions. As ;i student he is 
above the average. He comes to his classes with 
well prepared lessons. His especial interest is in 
athletics. He takes part in all school sports with 
an eagerness and an enthusiasm that are ton 
tagious. Although a senior he has the blush of 
a small boy, hence his name "Red'' among the 
boys. The class of '24 is expecting great things 
of Archie. 

"Success is two per rent genius and ninety-eight 
per cent work." 



Rachel Bishop 
Belhavex, N. C. 

Rachel, the real brunette of the class, hails 
from Belhaven. Rachel wins us with her lovely 
voice, but she wins us also witli her ready laugh 
and gay spirit. She is frank, candid, and inde- 
pendent. She ranks well as a student ; never- 
theless, she believes in the policy "All work, no 
play, will make Rachel a dull girl." She wants 
her share of play and "dates" and, — since she is 
Rachel — usually gets them. 

" Tis the songs l/OU Sing antt the .smites you wear, 
'that moke the sunshine everywhere." 



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Della M. Winstead 
Whitakebs, N. C. 

"If music ha tli charms to sooth the savage 
breast," Delia can tame the wildest heart. She 
is one of Miss Smith's star pupils. However, 
music is not by any means her only accomplish 
nient. She is a girl of great dependability — al- 
ways in her place and "on the job" whether .the 
program calls for work or play. She puts her 
whole soul into her school work and all activities 
connected with the college life. Thru' her 
earnest desire to make the best of her college 
course, she has made of herself a capable, well 
poised, young woman, holding high ideals. But 
uliy continue — Della can speak for herself — and 
(in her quiet way) she usually does. 

"Jler voice was ever soft, gentle, and loiv ; an 
excellent thing in woman," 



Olin E. Fox 

Farmville, N. C. 

The Class of '24 is fortunate in having among 
its members several men of maturity and experi- 
ence. Mr. O. E. Fox is one of these. Mr. Fox 
came to us two years ago from Georgia. He is 
now the beloved minister of the Farmville Church. 
With genuine interest he has entered into the life 
of the school and has made for himself a place in 
the hearts of the students. Modest and unassum- 
ing in his bearing, he yet impresses those who 
meet him as a man of worth and ability. 

"A good name in man in the immediate jewel 
of his -soul." 



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Sadie E. Greene 
Pantego, N. C. 



The Class of '24 i.- fortunate in having S;nli<- 
as one of its number. In her we find many of 
the traits that t^o to make up a splendid, all- 
round student. Her dramatic ability, her religious 
enthusiasm and her friendly manner are qual- 
ities which mark her as "different," She has 
filled high positions of trust and won many hon- 
ors which indicate her ability and popularity. 
* In recognition of her talent for public speaking 
she was elected one of the Inter-Society Debaters 
of '24. She has been a good student, a faithful 
tea:her, a loyal companion and friend. Her 
memory will ever linger in the hearts of her 
classmates and friends. 

"One who attempted and never stood in doubt, 
Nothing so hard but what she found it nut." 



Amanda Ross 
Washington, N. C. 

One of the mo*t brilliant students of the class 
is "Mandy." She may not be exactly on the dot 
to her appointments but when she gets to her 
place every one knows she is around. She is not 
only an apt student, but a girl full of life and 
"wit" ; ever a tease, yet with a personality as 
attractive as her dimples and smiles; a good sport 
in every sense of the word, yet serious minded 
enough to be one of the members of the Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinet. When thinking of her it is impos- 
sible to avoid mentioning her athletic inclinations, 
for along this line she has excelled. In every way 
she is an "all-round" girl. 
"The most manifold sign of wisdom is continued 

cheer." 



[Page Thirty-five) 



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Timothy Bowen 
Pinetown, N. C. 

"Tim," as he is called by all who know him, 
came to our class four years ago from Pinetown, 
Beaufort County. Stick-to- it iveness is Tim's great 
characteristic. He never gives up ; never recog- 
nizes defeat. Success is certain for such a man 
as that. He has won fame as guard on A. C.'s 
gridiron. He has won popularity too. His 
friendliness, good humor, and willingness to "help 
out" on all occasions have made friends for him 
on every' hand. The class of '24 is proud to have 
Tim a member. 

"Ambition? Yes, J have ambition!" 



Amelia Ballou 

Wilsox, N. C. 

Who hut Amelia possesses a disposition so 
.friendly, so friend loving, and so whole hcartedly 
genuine 1 She radiates such a wealth of sun- 
shine and personality that few can resist the 
magnetism. Amelia possesses decided literary tal- 
ent. She can compose a song while cooking supper 
and write a whole page of jokes while washing 
the dishes. Her clever comments and "side re- 
marks" in chapel and in classes have made her 
known as the Class humorist. She is always 
ready for fun and nonsense, yet her lessons never 
suffer. She is recognized by the teachers and stu- 
dent body as one of the brightest girls on the 
campus. 
"We meet thee, like a pleasant thought, when 

such are wanted." 









[Page Thirtt-six] 



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J. Arthkr Taylor 

Wilson, N. C. 

June is the pastor of tlie second Christian 
Church, Wilson, N, C. As a preacher he is 
well liked and respected. He has a record of 
building up churches wherever he has been. June 
is a quiet man with cheerful and friendly ways, 
a man of integrity and high purpose. Since 
entering A. C. C. in the fall of '21 he has made 
a host of friends. Of mature years and experi- 
ence, he has been a sort of older brother to the 
other members of the Senior class. None so 
well as he has been able to pour oil on the 
troubled waters. 
"Truth from his lips prevails with double meat/.' 



Mary Stanton Richardson 
LaGrange, N. C. 

Mrs. Mary Richardson, already a teacher of 
wide experience, came to A. C. C. this year to 
extend her scope of knowledge. Mrs. Richard- 
son, with her quiet, unaggressive manner, has 
won a warm place in the hearts of all. From afar 
come rumors of her reputation as a "live wire" 
in schools over which she has previously held sway 
as principal. As to her virtues which we have 
discovered during her short stay at A. C. 0., 
one of the chief is her ready command of language 
and flow of conversation. With it she enlivens 
classes which might otherwise wax dull. She 
is faithful, earnest, and thoroughly sincere. 

"She holds the eel of knowledge by the tail." 



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[Page Thirty-seven] 



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Annie Kate Oakley 
College Park, Ga. 

Annie Kate came to us last year from Atlanta, 
Georgia. Annie Kate's most lovable character- 
istics are cheerfulness, generosity, and friendli- 
ness — "and the greatest of these is" — friendli- 
ness. Coming to A. C. C. a perfect stranger to 
all, she immediately set about making friends. 
Unconsciously she is a striking proof of tin- an- 
cient adage— -"If you would have friends, first 
show yourself friendly." She is a friend to all 
— the foe, the friendless. Now, too, it is whis- 
pered that Annie Kate is addicted to that rare 
and seldom cultivated habit of burning much 
midnight oil; hence, she is known as a "night- 
hawk." On good authority it is said that she is 
the only known specimen of this rare and soon- 
lobe-extinct species. 
"Gentleness, cheerfulness, and urbanity are tin 

three graces of manners." 



Lewis IT. Whitehead, Jr. 
Dover, N. C. 

Lewis, our representative from Craven County, 
came to us four years ago. At that time a long, 
lanky freshman, green from the country was he I 
Since then he has grown in stature and in the 
admiration of bis friends. Among the members of 
the student body lie is well liked for be belongs 
to no especial "crowd" but is friendly with all. 
Through bis frankness and sincerity he has "won 
the favor of the faculty. He is an "incorrigible 
optimist," never discouraged, no matter how hard 
I he task. The class of '24 wishes him success 
and happiness. We are glad to have you, Lewis, 
as one of our number. For you we ask but one 
thing — time. 

''For pluck and worth 
O'er all fhr earth 
Will win the prize, at last." 



[Page Thirty-eight] 



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Senior Class History 



IX the fall of 1920 there appeared on the campus of A. C. C. representative 
specimens from Washington, Belhaven, Whitakers, Greenville, Farmville, 
Arapahoe, and other prominent towns of North Carolina. It was a gather- 
ing to be proud of — the largest Freshman class in the history of Atlantic Christian 
College! We had come to A. C. C. to get an "education;'' and Freshmen we were, 
too, in more ways than one. One could hear us constantly ask, "Where is room 
six?" "Which is the way to the hoy's dormitory?" or "How far is it, please, to 
the "white house?" What amusement the upper classmen found in "breaking us 
in." This, (to us, painful, but for us, perhaps, necessary) process had been accom- 
plished by means of various and varied experiences, zeros, and campusings, recep- 
tions, church services, mid-night feasts, etc. June found us ready to become 
Sophomores. 

After three months of freedom from rules, light bells, marching to church, cram- 
ming for examinations, and "beaux" we found ourselves back again on the campus 
— Sophomores ! Much to our grief and sorrow we found several missing from our 
number. Milton Jefferson had been drawn away by the lure of business and be- 
come a traveling salesman. Effie Davis Koonce had felt the "call" to teach. Oh 
what a time we had watching the Freshmen come in! How we gloried in being able 
to impart a portion of the knowledge we had gained so painfully the year before! 
Now we had the pleasure of telling them where the "white house" was and the 
way "cross the street to the store." As Sophomores we entered with more enthusi- 
asm into the various activities of the college life. One of our number, Delia Win- 
stead, won the faculty loving cup that year. The year passed pleasantly until it 
was time once more to say "good-bye" to our many friends and with the great vision 
of "Junior year" before us, depart for home. 

Another September rolled around ! -Juniors — real "honest-to-goodness" upper 
classmen now ! Again we found our ranks depleted. Ruby Evans had decided 
to attend G. C. W. Dolly Lewis and Vivian Holden had become country "school 
niarms." On the other hand we had gained several new members. Among these 
were our "Brer Fox," of Farmville, Mr. Humphreys, of Lexington, and Amelia 
Ballou, of Wilson. What else could there be in life for us ? We were approaching 
nearer and nearer to Senior year. Our Junior class proved to be one that A. C. C. 
could well be proud of. One of our members, Elizabeth Etheridge, won the schol- 
arship cup; another, Archie Beel, the athletic cup and the presidency of the Hes- 
perian Literary Society; still another, Sadie Greene, a diploma in Expression. 



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[Page Thirty-nine] 



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Our interest in our school work — history and mathematics and English and the 
other subjects — was deepening. "We began to realize the truth of the classic 
rhyme — 

"The world is so full of a number of things 
I'm sure we should all be as happy as kings." 
The faculty began to place responsibility on us. Ever before us, though, was that 
long sought for goal, "Senior Year." 

Senior Year! And, to our delight, again our class had increased. Willia 
Lusby — how soon she made a place for herself in A. C. C. — had come to us from 
Kentucky. Elizabeth Etheridge and Mr. .Tune Taylor, after a term in the sum- 
mer school were able to finish with us.- Amanda Ross, a former student had found 
her way back for her senior year's work. Mrs. Mary Richardson, too, had stopped 
teaching for the same purpose. How proud and happy we were over the increase! 
Now there were among us teachers, preachers, readers, singers ami musicians. 
"Ah," we said to ourselves, "What a mark we shall make in the world." We have 
Lewis, and Milton, and Archie, the philosophers, (real Platos, too!); we have 
Bonner and Rachel, our Caruso and our Galli-Curci. We have Tim, Mr. Fox, Mr. 
Taylor, Mr. Humphreys, and Mi'. Henderson, our Billy Sundays; and Mrs. Rich- 
ardson, the "school-mum"; Sadie, the elocutionist; Mrs. Henderson the "little 
housewife"; Willia, the "Kentucky maid"; Elizabeth, Amanda and Annie Ruth, 
real Juliets; Amelia, the young "phychologist" ; Delia, the pianist." 

This year has proved to be a great one — better even than our dreams of it. 
As it draws to a close we appreciate more and more the opportunities which have 
been ours during our life as students of Atlantic Christian College. What friend- 
ship we have found! What lessons we have learned! What dreams we have 
dreamed ! Seniors, the future belongs to us. Let us go up and "possess the land." 

For here 

"The work is done ; to other tasks 

A hundred voices cat I! 
May the dear Lord of life and light 
Keep watch between us all." 



[Paoe Forty] 



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Poem 



(Apologies to Loxgfellow) 



IN the State of Carolina. 
In the little Town of Wilson, 
Stand the halls of A. C. College. 
Dear in thought to her alumni. 
There the wise and learned professors 
Teach each coming class of students — 
Drill them well in concentration 
And in all the arts of learning 
That, whene'er they leave this college. 
They may be full-steeped in knowledge. 

To this far-famed source of knowledge. 
In the Year of Nineteen-Twenty, 
Came a class of verdant Freshmen 
Knowing little, hoping great things. 
As the years pass on with swiftness. 
Each one greeting other Freshmen. 
This class soon would be forgotten 
Were it not for graduation 
When these students soon will leave us — 
Leave us for the World, the Unknown. 

Then we gaze around in wonder. 

Gaze with rapture as we marvel 

At the wondrous mighty changes 

That these years have brought upon them: 

At the mighty muscled athletes. 

They the wearers of the letters; 

And the many skilled musicians. — 

They the sweetest of all singers — 

Aided by their loved pianist. 



Not the least of these, the noted, 

Are the ''Black-Robe Chiefs." the preachers 

Stammering in their speech a little 

Speaking words yet unfamiliar. 

Trying with their new-found knowledge 

To interpret to the people 

Secrets in the Book of Ages. 

And beside them stand the teachers. 

The dispensers of the knowledge 

That they gained at A. C. College, 

Ever helping — hoping, trusting 

That in days to come, the future. 

They may send to us more students 

That they, too, may gain in wisdom. 

Who are these who stand beside us. 
In their eye anticipation, 
Th,ey whose tongues are ever ready 
With deep philosophic phrases, 
Ethics, logic — unknown language 
To this class in Nineteen-twentyt 
And among these stars assembled 
There is one. the great debater. 
She the marvellous story teller, 
Teacher of the mystic short hand. 

These the product of the four years 
Spent in thinking, reeding, learning; 
Heeding well the words of wisdom 
Of th,e wise and learned professors. 
As we watch them rising, rising 
High into the realms of Seniors, 
As we gaze and as we listen, 
"Fare the well, our Alma Mater," 
Comes a whisper of the east wind 
"Fare the well, dear A. C. College." 

Amelia Ballou, Poet 



[Page Forty one] 




Senior Class Prophecy 

"They asked me to prophesy 
But I knew not what to do, 
For I wasn't born a prophet 
Any more than were you." 

CREDICTIONS concerning this class must to some degree be void of that 
wonderful stimulus that has proved so often the good angel of Class 
prophets, viz: The subject of matrimony. For you see, a number of us 
have our sentence already sealed, and with many of the others, there is hq room 
for speculation. So .in this case it were easier to be a sage than a prophet. 

However, to prophesy or not to prophesy is not the question. For prophecies 
must need be made. But whether 'tis nobler to play the role of an optimist and 
thus take arms against the shafts of ilhvill and criticism of the class, or, tell the 
truth and for that be led to suffer, perchance to die, ay, there's the rub ! For the 
very thought of a prophet's death must needs give us pause. For who could bear 
the whips and the scorns of this noble class? 

So, let us take a "dip into the future, far as human eye can see." Then you will 
see still the influence of the Class of 1924. In order, however, that this prophecy 
may be accepted by a skeptical and gainsaying generation, let us not go beyond 
the immediate future — 1940. For in this incredibly short time the dreams of 
Plato's "Republic," Moore's "Utopia," Bacon's "Atlantis" and Herrington's 
"Oceana" have become mere kindergarten ideals. 

I cranked my "Ford-o-plane" one fine day and started out to visit the members 
of the class. I found Archie Reel in Chicago gazing at the moon through a most 
powerful telescope. He stopped just long enough to tell me that he was making 
a special study of the Canals on the Moon preparatory to launching a tremendous 
drainage system for Eastern North Carolina. 

At the mere mention of Carolina, I instinctively "nosed" my plane toward the 
"Old North State" and in a few hours landed at Chapel Hill. Here I found 
John Humphreys in the University. He is Professor of All the Languages under 
the Sun. He has even found out how the ants talk to one another and has trans- 
lated their language into written form. From John I learned that many of the 
Class were still in the state and with the necessary information, I started upon 
one of the most pleasant laps of my whole journey. 

At Yadkin Hill I discovered Tim Bowen established for life. Here he has 
found ample opportunity for the expression of all his oratorical ambitions. The 
people come from afar to hear him preach. He has so popularized the country 
parish, it has become most difficult to keep preachers in our city churches. 

Driving on toward the East, I felt that I must stop in Pitt County. I not only 
had the memory of many pleasant years in that county, but I knew that here 
lives Elizabeth Etheridge, the ruling queen (if a little vine-covered cottage by- the 
road. 



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At Scotland Xeck, I had a most delightful visit with Milton Move. After 
graduating from A. C. C. Milton went to the State University for a special course 
in agriculture. Then he took charge of an ordinary East Carolina farm at 
Scotland Xeck and transformed it into a veritable paradise. I instinctively 
looked for further explanation of all this beauty, I understood perfectly when I 
saw — Annie Ruth. 

From here I visited Delia Winstead. With her wonderful skill and knowledge 
of health and sanitation Delia has become the good St. Patrick of Hyde County. 
Not a mosquito can be heard throughout the land. I learned from Delia that 
Rachel Bishop was still at home in Belhaven. And to my surprise she had never 
married. The only explanation Delia could give was that Rachel was too much 
in love with love to break the spell. 

My next stop was in Jackson, Miss. June Taylor is State Secretary, and in this 
work he has surpassed even C. C. Ware. This has been possible of course because of 
bis training in the Class of '24. June told me that Annie Kate Oakley was 
coaching the coach of the Geo"«c'a University football team and that Amelia Ballon 
was State Superintendent of Schools in Alabama. He also informed me that Otto 
pnd Lucret ; a Henderson hid charge of the recreational department of a great in- 
stitutional church in Atlanta. 

I took a swing around through Texas, stopping at Dallas with L°"* n °s White- 
head. Levis hfs made himself a benefactor to the whole south, lie has become the 
Charles Martel in the warfare against the lull weevil. He is living like a king 
upon the voluntary royalties sent to him by the cotton farmers of the country. 

I passed through Kentucky just in t'me to witness the (dose of one of the most 
exciting political campaigns in the history of the State. Willia Lusby had been 
elected to Congress. Xo one could stop in Kentucky even for an hour without being 
affected by the great political stir. I found that two women were almost solely 
responsible for the success of the campaign — Sadie Greene and Amanda Ross, who 
had become two of the most prominent lawyers of the state. 

While in Kentucky, I procured some very interesting items of information 
about Mrs. Richardson. One is of especial interest — her attitude toward matri- 
mony. Already you may have correctly guessed. She changed her mind! 

Before reaching New York City again, for there is where 1 am making my 
headquarters, serving as Church Landscape Gardener, I stopped to see Bonner 
Jefferson, who has charge of Thomas Edison's laboratory. He 1 has discovered 
the process whereby the heat energy may be extracted from a brick-bat. He as- 
sured me that the first benefits from his wonderful discovery would be given to 
A. C. College. And the seven large and handsome buildings which have replaced 
the old A. C. C. buildings may now he adequately heated from the energy of one 
brick-bat. 

May I say, in conclusion of this most modest portrayal of the achievements 
wrought by my class-mates that it is well a class so brilliant as ours is graduated 
only about every twenty years. Otherwise, hundreds of young men and women 
would weep with Alexander because there remained no more worlds to conquer! 

O. E. Fox. Prophet. 



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Senior Class Son 

Tune: "Dream// Melody" 



9 



I'm in love with our A. C. C. 
It captured me, 
It's a part of my heart, 
Helping me, and I'm forever saying: 
"Sing with hearts of loyalty 

That old sweet song of A. C. C. 

Sing it sweet and tenderly, 

I don't know why I love it so, 

All Seniors sing it where'er they go; 

Hear the praise we give to thee; 

You'll linger forever just like a memory, 

Oh, Seniors, let us sing, with praise, to A. C. C." 

Night and day with a grateful heart 
We look to thee 
Our deal' Alma Mater, 

Leading us, and that's why we keep saying : 
"Sing with hearts of loyalty 

That old sweet song of A. C. C. 

Sing it sweet and tenderly, 

1 don't know why I love it so; 

All Seniors sing it where'er they go, 

Hear the praise we give to thee; 

You'll linger forever just like a memory, 

Oh, Seniors, let us sing, with praise, to A. C. C." 



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[Page Forty seven] 




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Charlie Grky Raulen 

Wilson, N. C. 

Charlie Grey is the happy 
possessor of many talents. For 
several years she has starred 
in the College Dramatic Club. 
Twice she has represented the 
Alethian Literary Society in 1" 
ter-Soeiety debate. She has a 
gift for drawing that is invalu- 
able when the occasion calls 
for posters and cartoons. Her 
talents win our admiration, and 
her personality wins our heart. 
Diligent in her studies, brim- 
ful of enthusiasm, and always 
ready with new ideas, she fills 
a large place in our College ac- 
tivities. 

"To be (/lad of life because 
it gives yov. a chance to love 
and work and play." 



Everett J. Harris 
Englehard, N. C. 

Earnestness, practicability, en- 
ergy — these are Everett's dis- 
tinctive qualities, Much of the 
success of this volume of The 
Pink Knot will be the result 
of his untiring eff rts. In bis; 
eyes gleams the fire of a deter- 
mination not easily balked. He 
is ambitious for himself. He 
meets the problems of college 
life with cheerful optimism and 
common sense. He lias, we be- 
lieve, qualities which will make 
him an efficient business mnn. 
".1 quid , earnest, upright man, 
Who meets the world with a 

brave, "I ran." 



Liu, Winstead 

Elm City, N. C. 

Lill, our fair representative 
from the "city of Elms," is a 
general favorite. Although she 
may not live with the immortals 
as a student, no girl in school 
has a more charming and lov- 
able personality. Love and 
service are the two basic prin- 
ciples upon which she has built 
her philosophy. Her love mani- 
fests itself through sympathetic 
deeds. She rejoices with those 
who rejoice, and mourns with 
tbo^e who mourn. A genuine, 
sincere, and trustworthy com- 
rade, she numbers her friends 
by her acquaintances. Of no 
one we know can it more truly 
be said, 

"None knew her but fo (ore her. 
None no turd her but to praise." 






[Page Fortt-eight] 



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Reba M. Sttbbs 
Wilson, N. C. 

Reba came from Belhaven, to 
A. C. C. three years ago. She 
Is a very attractive and charm- 
ing girl, full of enthusiasm and 
life. She is frank, friendly, and 
independent. Her special school 
interests lie along lines dramatic 
and social. She is a star in the 
College Dramatic Club and an 
ardent participant in all parties, 
spreads, and other social "do- 
ings" of the College. 

"There is no wisdom, like 
frankness." 



& 



Pahp.on G. Gallop 

Jarvisburg, N. C. 

Parron, sometimes called the 
Demonsthenes of the school, is a 
serious minded youth here for 
business. We find him diffi- 
cult to understand at times, but 
once understood, we have in him 
a staunch friend. He has con- 
victions and for these he is 
ready to tight. Such an atti- 
tude commands the respect of 
friend and foe. He is inter- 
ested in all student activities ; 
he is a main stay on the foot- 
ball field ; he is a member of 
both the Dramatic Club and the 
Glee Club. Part of his leisure 
time he spends in discussing 
great orators. During his fresh- 
man year he won the inter-so- 
ciety oratorial contest. His 
chief asset is confidence. 

"// confidence wins he will be 
numbered among the renowned." 



Mrs. Fred M. Pearce 
Wilson, N. C. 

Mrs. Pearce, coming to us to 
finish her A.B. work after sev- 
eral years of teaching, has made 
a permanent place in the hearts 
of A. C. C. folk. Her unfail- 
ing sweetness, her college spirit, 
and her willingness to work have 
won for her friends by the score. 
She's of us, and for us — could 
we desire more from anyone? 
"O blest with temper whose un- 
failing ray 
Can make tomorrow as cheer- 
ful as today." 



[Page Fortt-nine] 



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Kith Skinnee 
Farmville, N. C. 

Ruth Skinner is a girl of 
whom the Junior Class is ex- 
ceedingly proud. No student 
in the College has a clearer 
brain or a kinder heart than 
she. She. is a star pupil in 
English. She is friendly to- 
ward others and ambitious for 
herself. Some times she is 
moody, sometimes joyful, but she 
always stands for the things 
that are true and "altogether 
lovely." 

"He ntle of speech, beneficient 
of mind," 



«M 



Moses T. Moye 
Farmville. N. C. 

When Moses came to A. C. C. 
lie brought hie sunny, easy- 
going disposition " with him. 
This characteristic has won for 
hi in a pleasant association with 
the entire student body. Moses' 
great interest lies in music. If 
the invitations that he has re- 
ceived to sing at High School 
entertainments, receptions, and 
socials are any indications of 
his ability, his success as a 
soloist is assured, and we can 
predict for him a useful and 
happy life in the field of evan- 
gelistic singing. 
"No nightingale did ever chaunt 

More welcome not en to weary 
bands 

Of travelers in some shady 
fi a tint, 

Antony Arabian sands.'' 



Mae Stanchx 
Washington, N. C. 

A joy of the class is Mae with 
Ii«t bubbling spirits and caprici- 
ous way. Magnanimity is her 
star virtue for her heart is one 
of the biggest on the campus. 
She is quick, capable, and a 
thoroughly "good sport," pure, 
sterling, guaranteed not to tar- 
nish. She is always frolicsome, 
cheerful, constant, kind — attri- 
butes of inestimable worth. 
When she forgets to smile it is 
indeed a woeful day for all of 
us. 
".1 face with gladness over- 

spread, 
Soft smiles by human kindness 

bred." 



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[Page Fifty] 



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Agnes Coub 

Wilson, N. C. 

She's little, and she's neut, 
and she's sweet ; not talkative 
unless wit] i those who know 
her well, hut smiling usually, 
and always friendly. Agnes is 
a "town" gill, and in her home 
has more than once proved a 
very gracious hostess to many 
of the dormitory girls. Many 
of the girls have truly found 
her a friend in need. As a stu- 
dent she is quiet, unobtrusive, 
and faithful. She can be de- 
pended on to do thoroughly any- 
thing that she undertakes. 

"A quirt maid with pleasant 
wayx, and sweet.'' 



-J* -J* 



[Page Fifty one] 



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Junior Class History 






j* 



'7^HE document which you are about to peruse is one of no ordinary character. We, 
\J of the Junior class, are pleased to present a record of past distinction, present 
glory, and abundant hopes for future fame. We came about forty strong in the 
Fall of 1921 to A. C. C. from parts — known and unknown — to begin our college career. 
It was then that the erstwhile SENIORS became Freshmen, discarding a considerable 
amount of dignity and pride belonging to "High School Days." The times of novelty 
were soon over and even we, the Freshmen, learned that college was a place for serious 
minded people. With initiations, education notes, laboratory periods, and the general 
routine of college life, came at times dejection and discouragement. However, in spite 
of the struggles with geometry problems and the weary hours of toil spent in dissecting 
frogs and earthworms, we shared in the joy of others when the month of May came 
bringing us our degree of S. O. P. H. 

In September, 1922, we were glad to renew our friendships on a higher basis. Un- 
fortunately, many of our classmates had fallen by the wayside. Modesty forbids that 
we call this an illustration of the law of "the survival of the fittest." However, that 
may be, there were only a few left to cherish the fond memories of the freshies of '21. 
Of those remaining, we list here some of the most distinguished: Reba Stubbs, of Bel- 
haven, who quickly became the star of the Dramatic Club; Elizabeth Etheridge and Annie 
Ruth Jones, soon becoming bitter rivals for the familiar title of "Juliet"; Lill Winstead, 
the class artist and chief exponent of good-will; Louise Harrison, the jolly, good sport 
both in class and on the campus; Parron, "our Gallop," well-deserving the honor of 
class orator — having won the medal in the oratorical contest of '21; Alfred Flanagan, our 
president, a young man having favorable recommendations from the Glee Club of Wake 
Forest; Everett Harris, the veritable statesman from Hyde County; and Ruth Skinner, 
the physical giant, representing Farmville. 

Another vacation has passed and we find ourselves sole heirs to the Junior traditions 
of Atlantic Christian College. Our group has both decreased and increased. We have 
lost three valuable classmates in Mr. J. A. Taylor, Annie Ruth Jones, and Elizabeth 
Etheridge. These were able by doing summer work to join the ranks of the Senior class 
this year. However, we have gained, as well, as lost, worthy comrades. Mrs. Pearce has 
shown her worth by assuming the duties of literary editor of the Pink Knot. A further 
asset to the Junior class this year is Charlie Grey Raulen, one of the inter-society de- 
baters. We have recently come into possession of another silver tongued orator in 
G. H. Sullivan, a young minister entering our class. We hope that history will repeat 
itself and that this class will continue to be renowned for its famous men and women. 

Ruth Skinner, Historian 






[Page Fifty-two] 




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Junior Poem 

(Apologies to Mr. Kipling) 

IN the halls of A. C. College quite far distant from the sea 
There's a Junior class awaitin' for the days that are to be; 

For the future's ever eallin', and to them it seems to say: 
"Come ye on, you'll soon be Seniors, after graduation day!" 

On the road to Seniorland 

Whose bright vision is so grand 
As to beckon on the Juniors to this rosy-tinted land. 

On the road to Setiiorland 

Where the Juniors long to stand 
When we'll rule the underclasses with an iron-gloved hand. 

First time we saw this College teas in nineteen twenty-one, 
As our high school days were over, we thought all our icork was done, 
But those youthful vietvs are ended; Freshman thots are put away. 
We th,ink only of the future — let it bring us what it may! 

Let it bring us what it may. 

We are equal to the fray; 
We will show the other classes what the Juniors have to say! 

On the road to Seniorland 

Where the Juniors long to stand. 
When we'll rule the underclasses with an iron-gloved hand. 

When our classmates who have left us tell us what they now can do, 
They're workin' hard, but then — they make lots o' money, too. 
We just laugh, 'cause we could tell 'em a little thing or two; 
But roe just work on in silence; — soon we'll show what we can do! 

For we think of nothin' else 

But what the future tells, 
While the thoughts of coming greatness fills our hearts with joyous swells. 

On the road to Seniorland 

Where the Juniors long to stand 
When we'll rule the underclasses with an iron-gloved hand. 

Ship MS somewhere far from envy of the upperclassman' s state, 
For we are content to be here, and to share the Junior's fate. 
Though the "Senior rights" are tempting, to assume them ice don't dare, 
So we'll be content as Juniors, and their heavy yoke we'll wear 

Till proud Seniors we become 

Then we'll make this old place hum — 
If the other classes beat us, they'll sure be "going some"! 

On the road to Seniorland 

Where the Juniors long to stand 
When we'll rule the underclasses with an iron-gloved hand. 



[Paqe Fifty-three) 






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Sophomore Class 

Losker B. Bennett Arapahoe, X. C. 

"Great works are performed not by strength but by perseverance." 

■.« 

Nannie Pearl Quinerly Griffon, N. 0. 

"Unselfish, cheerful, kind-hearted as well, 
An unusual girl is Nannie Pearl." 



J. Park Nunn Kington, N. C. 

"Take everybody's advice. 
Then do as you please." 

J$ 

Walter B. F. Randolph Washington, N. C. 

"When hearts are true, 
Few words will do." 






[Page Fifty-six] 



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List of Sophomores 

Mittie Wiggins '. Elm City, N. C. 

"The mildest manners and the gentlest heart." 

Charles James Rural Hull, N. V. 

"Never do today what you can put off until next week." 

,* 

Annie Harper Wilson, N. C. 

"Give the world the best you have and the best will come back to you." 

Ji 

Paul Southard Slokesdale, N. C. 

"Success comes to him who pays the price." 

[Page Fifty-seven] 



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List of Sophomores — continued 

Janie Manning Middlesex, N. V. 

"God bless the good-natured, for they bless everybody else." 

•.< 

Louis A. Mayo Greenville, N. C, 

"Work before pleasure always." 



Ivy Mae Phillips . 



.Bridgeton, N. C. 



"A radiant smile is a shining star in the' crown of success." 

■.* 

Harold Whitley Pantego, N. C. 

"He. stands in day light, and disdains to hide 
An act to which by honor he is tied." 






TPage Fifty eight] 



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Lis! of Sophomores — continued 



"Fun is essential to one's well being." 



.Goldsboro, N. C. 



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[Page Fifty nine 1 



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Sophomore History 



r i M * HE beginning of our class of '26 was as all other classes in all other colleges. 
/ ^ Thirty-nine of the fitte.st came, and saw, and organized. Quite naturally we 
^■^ strolled around the first few days, seeing everything, giving our frank opinions on 
all questions and problems, trying to place our furniture at just the right angles to 
make our rooms look both cozy and roomy, figuring out which was the best way to go 
down town and the shortest distance to the dining hall. Not that we deigned to stare 
cr gaze at anything! No, indeed, we were far too knowing and sophisticated for that! 

The day of matriculation passed easily enough, the weeks of banquets and receptions 
sped by hurriedly enough, and the month for deciding which society we preferred passed 
by all too quickly. At the end of the month we felt electricity in the air. We knew 
that it was important we choose our society wisely. 

Hesperian or Alethian, which shall it be? 
I 'looked at my room-mate and she looked at me. 
Fortunately we all did decide according to the wisdom of Solomon. The societies had 
a vision of our worth and immediately began to put us to work — hence the great and 
immediate improvement in society programs! 

Although we could not agree upon our choice of a society, we raised our voices in one 
accord in praises to, and love for our "professors." We developed under our beloved 
teacher, Mr. Sadler a love for history, ancient and modern; we learned to work solid 
geometry problems under our most accurate and far seeing "Miss Fannie"; we grew 
in understanding and appreciation of English under our dramatic and inspiring Mrs. 
Grim. As Mr. Grim would say, we grew intellectually. But we were not one-sided: 
we grew and waxed strong in more ways than one. On Sundays the girls, who could not 
go home formed a solemn procession in front of the dormitory and as solemnly marched 
to church: thus spiritual growth. Every other Saturday night the more favored girls 
dressed in their prettiest and gayly marched down stairs to entertain their "gentlemen 
friends"; thus social growth. In the fall and spring of the year the boys and girls 
pooled their muscles and their lung power for the winning of games. At certain days of 
the week — unless we could persuade "Miss Fannie" that we had a "lame" back or a 
"lamer" head — we took physical culture; thus physical growth. 

The last days were darkened with many misgivings: — examinations loomed up before 
lis; a parting of friends had to come; accounts had to be given to our "folks" back 
home, and to our God who had given us this year in college. The term ended for our 
class as terms have ended for all freshmen classes. We had come, we had seen, we had 
conquered. 

After a happy vacation nineteen of the thirty-nine returned. Two others joined us. 
What happy days we spent together renewing "auld acquaintance" and making new 
friendships! The freshmen became our. special charge. We made it certain that they 
should feel as, we had felt one year earlier. For a day or two we did our best to get 
them "placed" and to give them a lively time. I am sure they appreciated our care! 
Those days are gone forever. 

As Sophomores we had to choose our major subject. Again we were divided in our 
choice. Some chose to seek fame in the pursuit of history, others to strive for glory 
in English, others to star in expression and music, and still others to search for renown 
in the sciences. Chemistry and Education, also had followers. 

We have had our work and our play, with plenty of rest: we have absorbed some 
knowledge, developed a little understanding, acquired a few facts, made many friends, 
gained new ideas and higher ideals, formed a few good habits, and come into possession 
of a greater love for people. Still we are not satisfied. We feel that "A little learning 
is a dangerous thing." We cry for more knowledge, more understanding, more appre- 
ciation of life, more love and more friends. Our thoughts already are flying swiftly 
across the summer months to that September day when we shall meet again in these 
blessed halls and, as Juniors, drink more deeply from the "Pierian Spring." 

Ivy PurLi.rps 






•MS? 









[Page Sixty] 




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A Psalm of Sophomore Life 

(With Apologies to Longfellow) 



H 



Tell me not, ye gloomy members — 

"Sophomore life is but a dream!" 
Tho' in classes some do slumber 

And "themes" arc not what they seem. 

Sophomore life is real and potent 
And the "date night" not its goal; 

Friendships dear become insolvent 
Sacred ties may bring us dole. 

Not adventure and not pleasure 

Is our destined end or way. 
But to serve that some lost treasure 

May he found on each new day. 

Work grows heavier, time much dearer 
Still with hearts both light and gay 

We will follow nearer, nearer — 
Ideals of the Junior way. 

Great Alumni still inspire us 
To endure all things for love, 

That great bond which to thee hinds us 
Alma Mater, from above. 

Let us worh with concentration 
As we reach the thickest fight, 

'Till achieving graduation, 

And the crown of glory bright. 












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[Page Sixty-two] 




[Page Sixtythree] 



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Freshman Class 
Evelyn Hardy LaGrange, N. C. 

"One of the most charming things in girlhood is serenity." 

•J* 

Reuben Banks Arapahoe, X. C. 

"Self-reverence, self-knowledge, self-control, 
These three alone lead -men to supreme power." 

Eloise Boweks Pembroke, Ga. 

"If thou would have singing. 
Then take Eloise." 



Ray McIlwean New Bern, N. C. 

"He has courage enough to attempt anything." 
J* 

Linda Clanton Ha pan, Ga. 

"Happy from care is she. 
Full of music as can be." 



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[Page Sixtt-four] 



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Mary Ethebidge A'r?i bridge, Va. 

"Pleasure fills our youthful years, 
Drop study if it interferes." 

George Stjmbell Harbinger. N. C. 

"It doesn't pay to worry, 
Things will happen anyway." 

Gladys Whitley Pantego, N. C. 

"Some talk seldom, some talk never, 
But Gladys, like a brook, flows on forever." 

H. LeRoy Harriss Greenville, N. C. 

"Press on and on, kind friend, 
And never think of stop 
Have no fear of crowding, 
There's always room at the top." 

Mary Harper Wilson, N. C. 

"A fertile brain, a calm and purposeful spirit." 

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Ruby Crockett Dunn. N. C. 

"Clean in principle. 
Pure in thought." 

John Turnage Ayden, N. C. 

"His virtues are many — too many to name. 
In rain and shine, John's always the same." 

Mary Alice Smith , Ayden, N. C. 

"She is pretty to walk with, and witty to talk with, and pleasant to think of." 
Elected Beauty Queen of Eastern North Carolina 

John Winfield Pantcyo. N. C. 

"Let me live beside the road and be a friend to man." 

Vivian Griffin Wilson, N. C. 

"In the lexicon of youth there is no such word as fail." 

[Pace Sixty-six] 



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Edna Wood LaGrange, N. C. 

"She's nice and neat from head to feet, 
A better girl you could not meet." 

Royall M. Philpott hcelsboro, N. C. 

"Deep thinking is his pastime." 

Mae Reel Arapahoe, N. C. 

"An all-round girl in Mae you'll find. 
Generous and helpful, gracious and kind." 

George Morris Conekin Wilmington, N. C. 

"Ambition makes geniuses" 

Martha Harrison Williamston, N. C. 

"She was ever fair and never proud; 
Had tongue at will, yet never loud." 



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Lucillk Baynes Winston-Salem, N. C. 

"Fair as a rose at dawn, 
And on her lips there's ever a song." 

Richard Rouse LaGrange, N. C. 

"Put not thy trust in woman and their loving ways, for verily they shall he thy downfall." 

Mary Sue King Falkville, Ala. 

"A sweeter maiden ne'er was seen 
Than Mary Sue, daughter of a King." 

Cecil R. Lee Wilmington, N. C. 

"Good humor only teaches charms to last, 
Still makes new conquests and maintains the past." 

Callie Harris Pike Road, N. C. 

"She hath a readier wit than any." 

[Paqe Sixty eight] 






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Ruby Highsmith Roper, N. C. 

"Blithe and gay throughout the day." 

Wade Waters Washington, N. C. 

"Men are born with two eyes and one tongue, that they may 
see twice as much as they say." 

Alberta Bass Lucama, N. C. 

"Gentle and true, 
Simple and kind was she." 

Dillox Peele Everett s, N. C. 

"Frailty, thy name is woman." 

Elizabeth Bass Lucama, N. C. 

"Goodness is the very flower of health." 






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Margaret Collins Trenton. N. C. 

"All the weary sounds of nature borrowed sweetness ot her playing." 

Hugh H. Ross. Jr Wilson, N. C. 

"And still they gazed, and still their wonder grew 
That one small head could carry all he knew." 

Charles Bali.ou Wilson, N. C. 

"He Is true, brave, and just, 
That man might honor and woman trust." 

Lyma Patrick Washington, N. C. 

"Her thoughts as pure as angels are. 
To know her was to love her." 

Harvey Underwood Bailey. N. C. 

"Harvey, so vigorous and strong". 
Makes others happy all day long." 



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Freshman Class History 



ON that well remembered day, September 10th. 1923, as the trains from all parts of 
the country pulled into the city of Wilson a large number of eager, energetic, and 
promising young men and women alighted. It was our class of '27! 

It was very exciting at the College that first afternoon. What fun we had meeting the 
girls and boys whom we had never seen before, "sizing them up" and wondering which 
of them were going to be our class mates! The old girls and boys seemed to be in 
every nook and corner. Sometimes we sat with our mouths open and eyes bulging 
out at the recital of some awful experiences we would have to go through. At night 
we retired to rest but some of us found ourselves unexpectedly sleeping on the side of our 
beds. When we asked for an explanation we were told that the beds "just automatically 
turned over." Had we known that the worst was then yet to come we would have been 
tempted to say "We want to go home to our mammas"; for "initiation" was in store 
for us. I shall not take time to go through a recital of this process because my Fresh- 
man vocabulary is much too limited to paint a picture or express the emotions of these 
fearful moments. Anyway, we are looking forward with the greatest anticipation to next 
year when we shall be the "old" girls and boys and in a position to direct the initiation. 

With lots of "pep" and high spirits we began our duties as Freshmen. We had just 
three months before been dignified seniors in high school and in some of us that "lordly" 
air still remained. Scarcely had we become accustomed to the senior, junior, and 
"sophomoric" tortures when another source of trouble was encountered; the faculty 
posted their grades of the first quarter. As we gazed upon them our "lordly" airs fast 
disappeared and we found ourselves becoming faithful, obedient Freshmen, saying by 
our new attitude, "We know that we know nothing; teach us." 

On the whole we have had a very successful year. Our Freshman class is the largest 
in the history of the College. We have had our "ups and downs." We have accomplished 
many things of which we are proud. In the work of the literary societies and in the 
other activities of our college life we have achieved a measure of success. We have made 
many friendships which we believe will last through life. We have had many "good 
times" at socials, sorority "doings" and we received, — some of us, anyhow, — new dreams 
and aspirations for the future. 

We believe no Freshman class of A. C. C. has ever had so bright an outlook as the 
class of '27 is now facing. We have hitched our wagon to a star. A. C. C. shall receive 
the best we can give. Our Freshman days are almost over. In many ways we are sorry. 
Our consolation is that on a bright September day not so very far distant we shall re- 
turn to A. C. C. in "sophomoric" glory. 

Eloise Bowers, Historian. 



•"ESS 



IIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIUHIII I ,1 , F ■ : : i M I I Fl 1 1 f [ 1 1 1 1 II I I 1 1 1 1 1 



[Page Seventy-one] 



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Freshman Class Poem 

Behold we stand 

A radiant hand 

Of searchers! 

Within our reach 
Lies broad the beach 
Of knowledge! 

Beneath the sands 
Lie buried lands 
Of treasure! 

Though others toil 
'J'ii win the spoil 
Of pleasure! 

The// wear the crowns 
Thai mark them clowns 
Of Folly! 

We seek today 
To find the way 
Of wisdom ! 

We dream of joy 
Without alloy! 
— Of service! 

Rose Tilghman, Poet. 









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Additional Classmen 



minors 



Mrs. John "W. Humphreys 



George H. Sullivan 



J* 



Soph 



omores 



Esther Bryant 
Elizabeth Johns 
Ava G. Mewborx 



Macon Moore 



Freshmen 



John Ross 
Lucille Carroll 
Henry G. Tyson 



Irving Finch 
Edwin Barnes 
Rose Tilghman 
Callie Sitterson 
Elsie "Wixstead 



Ben Eagles 
Willakd Moss 
Mamie Mercer 
Belva Adkins 
Margaret Ashford 



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Class Presidents 



Allen Johnson High School of '2k 

"W. Otto Henderson Class of '2k 

Louis A. Mayo (Center) Class of '26 

Parron Gallop ■ Class of '25 

H. Leroy Harriss Class of '27 



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SPECIALS 



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^WVlJSIC begins where words end. It is the universal language of man. It 
3-M-^ belongs to the soul and is a part of it. "There is music in all things if 
men had ears," sang Byron. 

But there is music' beyond that of the noblest symphony ever composed, beyond 
that of the finest note sung by tenor, soprano, contralto or bass, beyond that which 
peals from the organ, or comes from the choir or orchestra in whelming waves of 
sound. There is a music beyond that of the unheard rhythmic roar of the sci- 
entist's atom or the astronomer's singing spheres. There is music beyond the 
soft gentle cooing of the dove or the tender note of the nightingale in the moonlit 
glade, beyond that of the moan and sigh of the wind in the trees, beyond that of the 
rippling babble of the brook, or the splash of the long waveline on the sanded 
beach. There is a music beyond the clash and crash of bands, as men rush to 
conflict, beyond the soft cadences of the lover's lute as he sings to his sweetheart. 
It is the great diapason of humanity! Humanity which in its moil and toil, in 
its agony and martyrdom is struggling ever onward and upward, sings to the un- 
known its "Te Deum." 




[Page Seventy-six] 



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Ivy May Smith. B.M. 

Director of the School of Music 

Professor in Piano. Theory. Harmony. 
Counterpoint. Appreciation and History of 
Music. 

Graduate Pupil of the Metropolitan School 
of Music. Post-graduate Pupil of the Co- 
operative School of Music, Indianapolis. De- 
gree of Bachelor of Music, Indiana Uni- 
versity, Master Classes of Leo Sampaix, New 
York, Columbia University, summer, '23. 
Present position since 1916. 



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Bertha Louise Ashwortii, B.M. 

Professor in Voice, Harmony. History of 
Music and Sight Singing. 

Graduate Voice, Harmony, History of Mu- 
sic, Counterpoint, and Sight Singing, Wom- 
an's College of Due West, Due West, South 
Carolina, 1922. Director of Public School 
Music, Tuxedo, North Carolina, 1922-23. 
Present position, 1923-24. 



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Della M. Winstead 
Graduate from teacher's course in piano 

Christmas Vesper Service 

TUESDAY EVENING. DECEMBER IS. 1923 
Bight O'Clock 

Procjram 

Part I 

Processional — "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" Mendelssohn 

Invocation — President Hilley 

Carol — "Joy to the World the Lord is Come" Handel 

Scripture Reading — Miss Gladys Whitley 

Vocal Quartet — "Silent Night" Unknown 

Eloise Bowers Bonner Jefferson 

Rachel Bishop John W. Humphreys 

Reading — Miss Charlie Grey Raulcn 

Carol — "0 Little Town of Bethlehem" Reidner 

Pa in- II 

Cantata — "The Star of Bethlehem" Flaxington Marker 

Recessional. 

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ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Recital 

Saturday Evening, December 8, 1923, Eight O'Clock 

PROGRAM 

March, Opus 6 Eeitsch 

Margaret Colunb Mary Alice Smith 

Linda Clanton Mary Jones 

"Love is a Rose" Sans-Souci 

"Rockin' In de Win' " Neidlinger 

Eunice High smith 

"Romanza" (La Travita) Yerdi-Ocaten 

Margaret Collins 

Love's Waltz, Opus 59 Srhutt 

Linda Clanton 

"Good-Night, Sweet Dreams" Biachoff 

Bonner Jefferson 

Lustspiel Overture, Opus 73 Keler Brla 

Elsie Winstead Mary Harper 

Viola Freeman Amnie Berry 

"Elegie" Massenet 

Eloise Bowers 

Minuet in G Major Paderewaki 

Mary Jones 
Waltz in D Flat . Chopin 

Waltz in G Flat ' V/lopm 

Elsie Winstead 

Serenade Schubert 

Moses Moye 

Capricante, Opus 54 Hummel 

Della Winstead Bruce Alexander 

"I Judge Thee Not" Schumann 

"In Questa Tomba Oscura" Beethoven 

Samuel C. Taylor 

"O Thou Sublime Sweet Evening Star" Wagner-Liszt 

Della Winstead 

"Kentucky Babe" Giebel 

Eloise Bowers Bonner Jefferson 

Rachel Bishop Samuel 0. Taylor 

Recital 
Monday Evening, May 26, 1924, Eight O'Clock 

PROGRAM 

"Carmen" Bizet 

Mary Alice Smith Viola Freeman 

Mary Jones Janie Manning 

"Even Bravest Heart May Swell" (Faust) Gounod 

Timothy- Bowen 

Waltz, A Flat Major Moszkowski 

Mary Harper 

"Blow, Blow, Thou Winter Wind" Sarjrant 

Eloise Bowers 

Valse Caprice, Opus 7 Neivland 

Bruce Alexander 

"Love's Sorrow" Shelley 

"The Gypsy Trail" Kipling-Galloway 

Bonner Jefferson 

"Vivace" Movements (Scotch Symphony) Mendelssohn 

Elsie Winstead Linda Clanton 

Mary Harper Margaret Collins 

"The Cry of Rachel" Salter 

"What is Love?" Ganz 

Rachel -Bishop 

Waltz Chromatique, Opus 14 Godard 

Linda Clanton 

"Dreams" Stratezki 

"The Old Road" /. P. Scott 

Moses Mote 

"The Butterfly" Lavallee 

Elsie Winstead 

"Cone dal ciel precipita," (Macbeth) Verdi 

"Vieni ! la mia vendetta," (Lucrezia Borgia) Donizetti 

Samuel C. Taylor 

Hungarian Rhapsody, No. 6 Liszt 

Della Winstead 

"What From Vengeance," (Sextet Lucia) Donizetti 

"Swing Song" Cook 

Eloise Bowers Bonner Jefferson 

Lucille Baynes Moses Moye 

Rachel Bishop John Humphreys 

Annie Ruth Jones Timothy Bowen 









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Bruce Alexander 






Evelyn Hardy 


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Mary Jones 


Eloise Bowers 






Janie Manning 


Margaret Burden 






Joseph McEwen 


Eloise Case 






Moses Move 


Margaret Collins 






Nannie Pearl Quinerly 


Linda Clan-ton 






Mae Reel 


Mary Etheridge 






Mary Alice Smith 


Viola Freeman 






Harvey Underwood 


Mary Harper 






Della Winstead 


Roberta Hayes 






Elsie Winstead 



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VOICE STUDENTS 



Roll 



LUCILLE Baynes 
Rachel Bishop 
Ei.oise Bowers 
Timothy Bowen 
Eunice Highsmith 



C. Bonner Jefferson 
Annie Ruth Jones 
Moses Move 
Pail Southard 
Mrs. G. H. Suu.jvan 



Bertha Louise Asiiworth Instructor 



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Eloise Bowers 
Lucille Bay.nes 
Rachel Bishop 
Timothy Bowek 
Losker Bennett 
Ruby Crockett 
Viola Freeman- 
Vivian Griffin 
Parkon Gallop 
Evelyn Hardy 

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GLEE CLUB 



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Lii.l Winstead 



Ruby Highsmith 
Martha Harrison 
Annie Ruth Jones 
Mary Jones 
Bonner Jefferson 
Willia Lusby 
Moses Move 
Lyma Patrick 
Mae Reel 
Pai l Southard 
Deli.a Winstead 



Bertha Louise Ashwortu Director 



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Music 



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^WvUSIC is the universal language which appeals to the universal heart of 

||l mankind. It was the first sound heard at the birth of Christ when the 

angels sang together aliove the plains of Bethlehem. 

The School of Music offers courses in piano and voice, with the theoretical 

courses. These courses consist of theory, harmony, counterpoint, history of music. 



musical appreciation, sight si 



The enrollment of the two departments is by 



far the largest in the history of the college. Every possible effort has been put 
forth for their interest and it has been a very successful year. Each pupil en- 
rolled is an active member of the "Ensemble Club" which was organized at the 
beginning of the year and which has proved a valuable organization. 

The Glee Club has a full enrollment and has prepared a number of selections 
for various occasions. These selections are: The Christmas Cantata "The Star 
of Bethlehem" by Flaxington Harper, "The Blue Danube Waltz," arranged by 
Strauss, with accompaniment transcribed from Weber's "Invitation to the Dance," 
Kipling's "Recessional" with accompaniment the same as the arrangement of 
Beethoven's "Minuet in G." The students have been very active, have worked 
diligently and faithfully in the Glee Club and have made possible the success 
achieved. 

Another organization of importance is the "Round-table." This club meets 
once a week for the purpose of teaching all vocal students the management and 
control of the breath and the development of the vocal organs. There is also 
a discussion of the most noted musicians and artists, both of the past and present, 
which gives the students a knowledge of what music has meant in the past and 
means today in the world. 

No life is well rounded without a knowledge and love of music. So it is the 
chief aim of the music department to implant in every student a love and appre- 
ciation of all that is best and most beautiful in the musical world. The time is 
long gone when music was regarded as a pastime. It has taken its place as one 
of the fine arts and none of them offer a broader field for culture. 



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Officers of Ensemble Club 



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Dki.la Winstead President 

Bonnkk Jefferson Vice-President 

Rachkl Bishop Secretary 

Samuel C. Taylor, Jr Treasurer 






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The Dramatic Club 



'/V HE College Dramatic Club, which comprises all the students in the School 
^^ of Expression, is a somewhat informal organization. Miss Reba Stubhs 
is its president. The primary object of the Club is the social and cultural 
development of its members. Through the series of recitals and plays presented at 
intervals during the course of each year it contributes also, in no small degree, 
to the enjoyment and interest of our College life. 

Among the programs of special interest this year were the following : "The 
Kleptomaniac," a play, presented in November; "Peg 0' My Heart," a dramatic 
interpretation, given by Miss Charlie Grey Raulen in February; and "Within 
the Law," a dramatic interpretation, given by Miss Sadie Greene in April. In 
addition to the programs presented in the College Auditorium the Club has given 
a number of "evenings" in the High Schools of this and the adjoining counties. The 
fifth annual Christmas party given the Monday evening preceding the opening of 
the Christmas holidays was an event eagerly looked forward to by the members of 
the Club, and when it came, one so lovely that it will be long remembered. Beau- 
tiful new light fixtures and curtains have been put in the Club room this year. 
Other improvements will be made before the year is over. The members of the 
Club are now working enthusiastically upon "Daddy Long Legs", the commence- 
ment play. Altogether, the Dramatic Club has had one of the most interesting 
and. ju-ofitable years in its history. 



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Atlantic Christian College 
School of Expression 

Recital 
FRIDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 14 

PROGRAM 

Part T 

Piano : "O Thou Sublime Sweet Evening Star" Wagner-Liszt 

Dkli.a Winstead 

"How Tom Sawyer Whitewashed the Fence" Twain 

Reba Stubbs 

Voice : Serenade Schubert 

Moses Move 

A Few Bars in the Key of G 

Sadie Greene 

Part TI 

"THE KLEPTOMANIAC" 
(A One-Act Comedy) 

Cast of Characters : 

Mrs. John Burton (Peggy), a young married woman Charlie Grey Raulen 

Mrs. Valerie Chase Armsby (Val), a young grass widow Reba Stubbs 

Mrs. Charles Dover (Mabel), a bride Ruby Crockett 

Mrs. Preston Ashley (Bertha), a lady with an inquisitive mind 

Elizabeth Etheridge 

Miss Freda Dixon, a young lady without an engagement ring Sadie Greene 

Miss Evelyn Evans, a reporter on a hunt for news Gladys Whitley 

Katie, Mrs. Burton's maid Roberta JIayes 

Scene: Mrs. Burton's drawing room. 



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Atlantic Christian College 
School of Expression 

Recital 

FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 28, 1924 

PROGRAM 

Part I 

Si, La Stanchezza M'opprimo, (U Trovatore) Verdi 

Rachel Bishop, Bonner Jefferson 

"Peg 0' My Heart" (Scene I ) Manners 

Miss Charlie Grey Raulen 

"As Long as the World Rolls On" Ball 

Moses Moye 

"Peg O' My Heart" (Scene II) Manners 

Miss Charlie Grey Raulen 

Minuet, Opus 15 Delahaye 

Miss Linda Clanton 

Part II 

MISS DOULTON'S ORCHIDS 

(A Two-Act Comedy) 

Caste : 

Mrs. Owen Belknap (Cecily), a young bride Maggie Lee Farmer 

Miss Polly Winslow, just engaged Beth Buerbaum Ricks 

Miss Bess Maynard, who doesn't have much faith in men. .Charlie Grey Raulen 

Owen Belknap, a young business man Paul Ricks 

Kenneth Moore, Polly's lover Park Xunn 

Gordon McAllister, who has proposed to many girls, now truly in love 

with Bess Louis Omer 

Scene I : The Belknap living room, morning. 
Scene II : Same, evening. 

[Page Nixety) 



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Officers of the Fellowship Club 



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First Semester: 

Timothy W. Bowen President 

Pail Southard Vice-President 

Ruth Skinner Secretary 



Second Semester: 

Losker Bennett President 

Royai.i. Piiilpott Vice-President 

Ivy Phillips Secretary 



Roll 



H. S. Hilley 

W. T. Mattox 

Perrv Case 

C. C. Ware 

F. F. Grim 

J. E. Stuart 

O. E. Fox 

6. H. Sullivan 

W, O. Henderson 

Mrs. W. O. Henderson 

J. W. Humphreys 



Sirs. J. W. Humph revs 
J. A. Taylor 
E. L. Finley 
Louis Mayo 
Paul Southard 
Felix L. Fox 
T. W. Bowen 
Losker Bennett 
John E. Croom 
Charles James 
Harvey Brookbank 
Parron Gallop 



Leo Weatherlv 
Royal] Philpott 
Everett Harris 
James Dawson 
Ernest Taylor 
Sadie Greene 
Ruth Skinner 
Annie Kate Oaklev 
Ivy Phillips 
C. Bonner Jefferson 
Moses Moye 



[Page Ninety-three] 




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IN older that we may keep up with the Y. W. C. A. news and so make our 
organization a growing one, we take the "Woman's Press" and "Wise Ideas." 
L;ut year we had two delegates to attend the "Cabinet Training Council" 
held at Charlotte, N. C, and two delegates to represent us at the "Montreat Con- 
ference." This year there has been no Training Council, but in the Spring we hope 
to appoint two or more delegates to represent us at Blue Ridge next summer. 

It has been our purpose to stimulate the interest of the girls by pointing out 
to them the principles of Christian life. 

Elizabeth Ethemdoe — President 



Cabinet Officers 

Elizabeth Etheridge President 

Rachel Bishop Vice-President 

Annie Ruth Jones Secretary 

Sadie Greene Treasurer 

Mary Alice Smith Chairman Social Committee 

Nannie Peabl Quinerly Chairman Finance Committee 

Lill Winstead Chairman Social Service Committee 

Ruth Skinner Chairman Program Committee 

Ivy Phillips Ch -.irm-jn World Fellowship Committee 

Amanda Ross Chairman Publicity Committee 

Della Winstead Undergraduate Representative 

Faculty Advisers 

Miss Frances F. Harper, Chairman 
Mrs. A. R. Moore Mrs. F. F. Grim 



[Page Ninety-five] 



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Religious Activities 






TfTLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE is the visible evidence that the Disciples of 
jji, Christ in North Carolina believe in Religious Education. Its growth and devel- 
ment are facts of which the Church is justly proud. 

The religious organizations within the College are likewise growing steadily from year 
to year. The students are touched by the Christian influences which radiate from them. 
The well known fact of the shortage in the ministry should cause Christian parents to 
dedicate their boys and girls to definite Christian service. The home supplies; the col- 
lege trains. The "Student Volunteer Band", "Boys' Prayermeeting", "Y. W. C. A.", and 
"The Fellowship" offer a definite religious activity for every student. 

The Student Volunteer Band, though small, is composed of students with the highest 
idealism and most heroic courage. This organization is to be the leaven that will per- 
meate the whole. The "Boys' Prayermeeting" on Wednesday evenings provides oppor- 
tunity for every element of worship, God to man, man to man, and man to God. The 
"Y. W." is filling a vital place in the training of the girls. The Sunday evening programs 
of this organization are always helpful and inspiring. The opportunities for religious 
expression result in increased faith, extended social outlook, and a determined purpose 
for unselfish service. "The Fellowship" is what the name implies, composed as it is of 
ministers and ministerial students associated in the most intimate relationships. The 
programs are varied and stimulating. Reports of week-end experiences, open discus- 
sions, lectures and sermons characterize the weekly meetings. At chapel the entire 
student group and faculty meet on a common level. Some mem'ber of this group, either 
President Hilley, a. professor, a representative from one of the literary societies, or a 
speaker from the outside brings a worth while message every day. This daily instruction 
together with the opportunity for worship creates a growing consciousness of the solidar- 
ity of the school or "college spirit." This consciousness further provides a proper unit 
for an adequate world outlook. 

A standing committee on religious education, composed of teachers and students, 
functions as a clearing house and as a rudder for religious activities. The above named 
organizations have their representatives on this committee. Each year this committee 
brings to the College a "meeting". The plan of the "meeting" is to have a forceful 
leader to bring a series of messages, usually at chapel, and in the evening, bearing upon 
questions of vital import to the students; questions pertaining to the individual's rela- 
tionship to Christ, to His Church, to the College, community, to a life vocation. The 
'^meeting" in conjunction with the regular chapel exercises might be thought of as a 
course in orientation. Some of the projects of the R. E. C. for 1924-25 reveal further 
the nature of its work. For instance, stimulating religious organizations, instilling a 
consciousness of personal responsibility, encouragement and promotion of general so- 
ciability, helpfulness in clearing up misunderstanding, interpreting vocations in the 
light of religious education, building up of religious library, are representative under- 
takings. The chairman of this committee is the head of the Religious Education De- 
partment in the College, and so unity of effort is made possible by a democratic guidance 
of all religious activities. We believe that students of Atlantic Christian College who 
avail themselves of the opportunities offered here will so profit that not only their own 
lives will be made richer, fuller, and more unselfish, but also the communities back home 
may look for the return of their boys and girls as the beginning of new life in their 
own religious activities. God grant that the school may not be disappointed in this 
hope. 






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'age Ninety nine] 









Mable Catherine Case, A.B. 

Instructor in English 



Agnes Peele, A.B. 
Instructor in Mathematics 




Alice Watson, A.B. 
Instructor in History and Languages 



iiiiiiiniiiuiii 



[Page One Hundred] 




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Senior Hicjh School 

Colors: Pinfe antf White Fi.owkh: fi/ife .Rose 

Motto: "Rowing, not drifting" 

Allen Johnson President 

Caroline Johnston Vice-President 

Mary Jones Secretary 

Viola Freeman Treasurer 

..< 

Class Roll 

Bruce Alexander Caroline Johnston 

Leaman Barnhill Mary Jones 

Clem Banks Allen Johnson 

Bert Bateman Thomas Moore 

Gladys Etheridge Belvin Starling 

Viola Freeman Samuel C. Taylor, Jr. 



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We're high school seniors, tried and true, 
Brimful of mischief and happiness too. 
We are working harder than ever before, 
We_are proud of out class of '2J/. 

We've all resolved to do our best, 

To know our lessons and pass the tests. 
But shadows of sadness jiass o'er our face, 

With no jolty juniors to take our place. 

Let us si rive to be loyal, earnest and true, 

Life's choicest blossoms our pathway bestrew. 
, where run such uplifting influences be 
Unless they are found at A. C. 0. 

Caroline Johnston, '24 



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Senior Class History 






eARLY in September, four years ago, several boys and girls entered various schools 
in the eastern part of North Carolina. They were freshmen beginning the first 
year of their high school career. As time passed, one by one came to the prepara- 
tory department of A. C. C. to finish that part of his school course. Thus, our present 
senior class was formed. My purpose is to give its history by noting a few outstanding 
qualities of the individual students. 

Our class president, Allen Johnson, from Ayden, joined our group in its sophomore 
year. "Snig," as we have learned to call him. shows a remarkable determination to do 
that which he believes to be right. Such a quality has enabled him to be a very ef- 
ficient leader. 

Our vice-president, Mary Jones, is a quiet, well poised girl from Grimesland. Mary- 
is a conscientious worker in all profitable activities in the school. 

Bert Bateman, our very competent secretary, is a Wilson boy who joined us during 
our junior year. He very early became familiar with the law of gravitation which he 
is very fond of demonstrating in the class room. Even though he is the most bashful 
one among us he has made rapid progress in winning the attention of the coquettish 
Viola. 

When we think of Bert we usually associate him with Viola Freeman, of Washington. 
Her's is a spontaneous, happy, carefree nature "whom to know is to love." 

A Wilson girl, Caroline Johnston, who came to us in our junior year, is modest and 
unassuming, given to much kindness as is shown by the fact that every afternoon two 
or three boys are waiting at the door to ask if she will take them up town. 

Clem Banks, from Arapahoe, has been a star football player on our team for three 
years. He is a big, strong fellow with a healthy appetite for dormitory food and a 
wholesome fondness for books. When he makes up his mind he is determined never to 
change it. Perhaps that is the reason why all of us regard him as an authority on all 
questions in class room work. 

The pet of the class is Belvin Starling, of Hassell. He is so sweet and winsome that 
all of us think of him as "little brother." Being the youngest member he has, no doubt, 
been somewhat indulged; yet he is not badly spoiled. 

Bruce Alexander, the irrepressible music loving youth from Ayden, has been with us 
only during our senior year. Most of his time is spent in dreaming of the day when 
he will rival Paderewski as the world's renowned pianist. 

Last and least in the class is Gladys Etheridge, from Saratoga. She is the only one 
of the group who, four years ago, entered the freshmen class at A. C. C. and is the only 
one, so far, who is proof against the darts of cupid. Her highest ambition is to be a 
school teacher a-la-spinster. 

This is the last class graduating from the high school department of A. C. C. The 
present history is written in language expressing the impressions of youth and immatur- 
ity. May the history in future years be written in terms setting forth the real achieve- 
ments of worthy, though humble men and women who have thought purely, lived nobly, 
and served faithfully. 

Gladys Etheridue, Historian 



[Page One Hundred Three] 



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ACTIVITIES 



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[Page One Hundred Five] 






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Officers oF Aleihicm Literary Society 

1922-1923 

.Milton J. Moye President 

Mary Alice: Smith Vice-President 

Annie Kate Oakley Secretary 

Royali. Piiii.pott Treasurer 

Willia F. Li shy Critic 

Rachel Bishop Pianist 

Paul Southard Chaplain 

Ciiahlie Grey Raui.en Chairman Program Committee 

1923-1924 

Parron Gallop President 

Everett Harris Vice-President 

Mary Jones Secretary 

Allen Johnson Treasurer 

Mary S. Richardson Critic 

Bruce Alexander Pianist 

LeRoy Harriss Chaplain 

Willia F. Lusby Chairman Program Committee 



ROLL 1923-1924 



Belva Aijkins 
Bruce Alexander 
Amelia Ballou 
Alberta Bass 
Elizabeth Bass 
Rachel Bishop 
Leaman Barn hill 
Esther Bryant 
Amnie Berry 
Edwin Barnes 
Harvey Bbookbank 
Charles Ballou 
Mary Bundy 
Lucille Baynes 
Manuel Castellanos 
Ruby Crockett 
Agnes Cobb 
Gladys Etiieridge 
Olin E. Fox 
Vivian Griffin 
Parhon Gallop 
Sadie Greene 
Annie Harper 
Mary Harper 
Everett Harris 
Roberta Hayes 
LeRoy Harriss 
a nnif Ruth Jones 
Mary Jones 
Allen Johnson 
Caroline Johnston 
Nellie Little 
Cecil Lee 



Willia Lusby 
Milton Moye 
Janie Manning 
Mamie Mercer 
Thomas Moore 
Moses Moye 
Park Nunn 
William Matthews 
Faiirar Omer 
Annie Kate Oakley 
Catherine Overman 
Dillon Feele 
Royce Pierce 
Royali. Philpott 
George Paui k 
Lyma Patrick 
Richard Rouse 
John Ross 

Charlie Grey Raui.en 
Mary S. Richardson 
Mary Alice Smith 
Pail Southard 
Bei.vin Starling 
George Sumrell 
Samuel R. Suitt 
Marjorie Smith 
Rose Tilghman 
John Tuunage 
Ernest Taylor 
Leo Weatherly 
Edna Wood 
John Winfield 



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OFFICIOUS (IF ALFTHIAN SOCIETY 






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OFFICERS OF HESPERIAN SOCIETY 









[Page One Hundred Nine] 







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Officers Hesperian Liferarq Society 

1922-1923 

C. Bonner Jefferson President 

Elizabeth Etheridge Vice-President 

Nannie Pearl Quinerly Secretary 

Lewis Whitehead Treasurer 

Della Winstead Pianist 

Timothy Dowen Chaplain 

Louis Mayo Critic 

Losker Bennett Song Leader 

Amanda Ross and Losker Bennett Cheer Leaders 

Elizabeth Etheridge. Amanda Ross and Sam Taylor Program Committee 



1923-1924 



Della Wi nstead -. 

Ruth Skinner 

Reuben Banks 

Timothy Bowen 

Elsie Winstead 

E. L. Finley 

Archie Reel 

C. Bonner Jefferson 

Viola Freeman and Ray McIlwean 

RUTH Skinner, Lill Winstead and Louis Mayo. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Pianist 

Chaplain 

Critic 

Song Leader 

Cheer Leaders 

.Program Committee 



ROLL 1923-1924 



Margaret Ashford 
Cynthia Askew 
Clem Banks 
Reuben W. Banks 
Bert Bateman 
Losker Bennett 
Timothy Bowen 
Eloise Bowers 
Lucille Carroll 
Linda Clanton 
Margaret Collins 
George Conekin 
Martha L. Congleton 
John Croom 
Elizabeth Etheridge 
Mary Etheridge 
E. L. Finley 
Viola Freeman 
Evelyn Hardy 
Callie Harris 
Esther Harrison 
Martha Harrison 
W. Otto Henderson 
Eunice Higiismith 
Ruby Higiismith 
Charles James 
C. Bonner Jefferson 
Elizabeth Johns 
Mary Sue King 
James Lawson 



Wade Lucas 

Louis A. Mayo 

Ray McIlwean 

Ivy Phillips 

Nannie Pearl Quinerly 

Walter Randolph 

Archie Reel 

Mae Reel 

Amanda Ross 

Hugh H. Ross, Jr. 

Pat'I'ie Ruffin 

Callie Sitterson 

Ruth Skinner 

DeWitte Speir 

Mae Stancill 

Reiia Stubbs 

George H. Sullivan 

.1. A. Taylor 

S. C Taylor, Jr. 

Henry G. Tyson 

Bod Waldo 

Charlie Moore Walker 

Esther S. Walls 

Wade Waters 

Mittie Wiggins 

Lewis Whitehead 

Gladys Whitley 

Harold Whitley 

Elsie Winstead 

Della Winstead 

Lill Winstead 



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Inter- Society Debaters of 1924 

Query: "Resolved — That the soldiers' bonus bill now before Congress should be 
enacted into a law." 



Alethian — Negative 
Charlie Grey Raulen 
Sadie Greene 



Hesperian — Affirmative (Winners ) 

Louis A. Mayo 

Nannie Pearl Quinerly 



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Athletic Association 






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"■ "^.AST year, the students, realizing the need of a larger budget for athletics, 
J mi, petitioned the Board of Trustees to add an additional matriculation fee of 
$5.00 which was to he turned over directly to the athletic association. This peti- 
tion was granted and now every matriculate of the College automatically becomes 
a member of the association. The money is proportioned among different depart- 
ments of athletics. The girls' basketball received one-fourth and the remaining 
three fourths were given to the hoys' football, baseball, and basketball in a ratio 
of 3-2-1 respectively. By this system athletics has been run on a much sounder 
financial basis this year than ever before. 

The athletic association, in cooperation with the faculty athletic committee, has 
charge of all athletic affairs. Meetings are held on the fifteenth of each month, 
at which time all business concerning athletics is transacted. The association 
elects the managers of the various athletic teams and finances each department 
of athletics in the College. 

The officers of the association are: 

Archie L. Reel, President 

Sadie Greene, Vice-President 

Park Nunn, Secretary 

Elizabeth Etheridge. Treasurer 












[Page One Hundred Fourteen] 



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Athletic Association. Officers 

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Archie Reel President 

Sadie Greene Vice-President 

Park Nunn Secretary 

Elizabeth Etheriiige Treasurer 

Parron Gallop Manager Football 

C. Bonner Jefferson Manager Basketball 

Amanda Ross Manager Girls' Basketball 

Everett Harris Manager Baseball 



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Athletics 



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'2^'HIS year most of our scheduled games are with other colleges. In past years this 
\J has not always been true. From this time on we expect to take our stand in 
athletics with the other colleges of the State. 

Considering the greatly curtailed schedule, the football season of 1923 was a success. 
Only five of the old men were back to form the nucleus around which the team was to 
be built. Of course, there were a number of freshmen who soon found their places on 
the squad. We played five games, four of which we lost; the other one we played to a 
scoreless tie. While we lost, we won, for our team went up against opponents of higher 
caliber and longer experience. There was no lack of fighting spirit, and in the long 
run, this spirit is sure to win in football. So we lost in scores but won in spirit. It 
must be remembered also that the scores show but a slight margin in the opponents' 
favor. This margin, however, indicates that it is impossible for Coach Fearce, or any 
other coach, to round into a smooth-working, winning team, in one year, a bunch of fel- 
lows that have never played together before. They lack the machine work. A winning 
football team is the result of two things — systematic coaching and experience in play- 
ing together. We have the first; the second we lack. Results from this year's develop- 
ment indicate that the material is here and what is needed is training and experience. 
Coach Pearce selected his team from the following squad: For the line, Banks, Whit- 
ley, Ross, Lee, Privette, Turnage, Mcllwean, Omer, Eagles. Gallop, and Waters; for 
backs, Tomlinson, Reel, Conekin, Waldo, and Lawson. 

In the way of inter-collegiate basketball the College has not done very much this 
year. This was due to the impossibility of obtaining an indoor court. But on the sug- 
gestion of Coach Pearce the association divided its members into six groups; three 
groups of boys and three groups of girls. Reel, Tomlinson. and Ross were captains of 
the boys' divisions; Stancill. Ross, and Tilghman were captains of the girls' divisions. 
These teams played a series of games which every one enjoyed. 

There was little need for finance in basketball so the money which had been allowed 
basketball was turned over to baseball in order that, in this sport, we might have a 
more successful season. In this department we are expecting to play our most con- 
spicuous part in the way of inter-collegiate athletics. Up-to-date manager Harris has a 
well arranged schedule which includes a one week's trip into the Western part of the 
State, and a number of shorter trips. Through the generosity of the Wilson Athletic 
Association we are allowed to play our home games at the League Park — one of the best 
diamonds of the Virginia League. Under these favorable circumstances we are expect- 
ing a very successful season. 



Wake Forest at Wake Forest 

State College at Raleigh 

Lenoir College at home 

Oak Ridge at home 

Oak Ridge at Burlington 

Elon College at Elon College 

Guilford College at Guilford College 

Lenoir College at Hickory 



The 


tentative 


schedule 


is as follows: 








March 


29, 








April 


7, 








April 


8, 








April 


12, 








April 


21, 








April 


22, 








April 


23, 








April 


24, 



[Page One Hundred Seventeen] 



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Physical Culture Class 



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Fred m. Peakce. 



.Athletic Director 



Roll 



Amanda Ross 
Esthkb Wauls 
Martha Conuletox 
Edna Wood 
Mae Stancii.l 
Makjorie Smith 
Martha Harrison 
Pattie Ruffin 



Cali.ie Sitterson 
Callie Harris 
Gladys Whitley 
Mae Reel 
Mary Sue King 
Viola Freeman 
Nannie Pearl Quinerly 
Ruby Crockett 



Lucille Baynes 









[Pace One Hundred Eighteen] 



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Girls' Basketball Team 

Fred M. Pearce Coach 



Team 

Mae Stanch,, Mae Reel, Edna Wood, Marjorie Smith. Esther Walls, Callie Sitter- 
son, Amanda Ross, Callie Harris, Mary Sle King, Viola Freeman, Pattie Ruffin, 
Rltby Crockett. 









[Page One Hundred Nineteen] 



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Roll 






Archie Reel 




Esther Walls 




Hugh Ross 




Edna Wood 




Louis Mayo 




Mar.iorie Smith 




Harold Whitley 




Vivian Griffin 




Leaman Barn hill 




Ruby Higiismith 




Otto Henderson 




Ruby' Crockett 




Milton Move 




Viola Freeman 




Bruce Alexander 




Pattie Ritffin 




Parron Gallop 




Eloise Bowers 




Manuel Castellanos 




Mary Etheridof, 



Manager 



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CLUBS 



[Page One Hundred Twenty-one] 






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Sigma Tan Chi 







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Founded October 3, 1920 
Sorority Mother: Mrs. A. E. Moore 



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Colors: T17n7e and Gold 



Flow 



White and Yellow 
Chrysanthemums 



YELL ! 
Yi! Yi! Yil 

Sigma Tau Chi 
C. I! II oo Do! 

So-rof-l-ti ! 

1920 
Kate Bowen Annie Ruth Jones 

Rachel Bishop Amanda Eoss 

Ruby Evans Mae Stancill 

Marjoeie Grantham 

1921 

Alice Galloway Lula Norris Cox 

Evelyn Phillips 

192-2 
Mary Alice Smith Effie Pridoen 



1923 



Viola Freeman 
Mary Jones 



Edna Wooi 
Mae Reel 



Motto: Sumus Unum 



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Phi Sigma Taa 







Founded 1912 
Colors: Black and Gold Flower: Black-eyed Susan 

Motto : Cor Unum, Via Una 



SORORES 



Mrs. H. P. Moseley 
Mrs. Paul E. Jones 
Mrs. Wohthington 
Henrietta Moye 

1913 
Mrs. Arthur White 
Mrs. George Tomlinson 

1914 
Mrs. E. S. Peele 
Mrs. Foxhall 
Ruth Hardy 
Annie Laurie Lang 

1915 
Mrs. Lucy Jones 
Charlotte Hodges 
Mrs. Samuel Lawrence 
Mrs. A. B. Windham 

1916 
Mrs. K. A. Stewart 
Mrs. Frank Sexton 
Mrs. Sultan Flowers 
Mrs. J. G. Luttrell 
Mrs. Byrii 
Mrs. Luther Tomlinson 

1917 
Mrs. Kate Price 
Grace Rice 
Lura Clay 
Mrs. Knott Proctor 



in Urbe 

1918 
Hattie Moseley 
Helene Hudnell 
Lottie Wilson 

1919 
Mrs. Irvin Winstead 
Leola Saunders 
Mrs. Allen Moore 
Christine Whitley 

1920 
Sallie Adams 
Anna Moore 

1921 
Gladys Peele 

1922 
Rosa Pridgen 
Reba Stubbs 
Margaret Eagles 
Lossie Tomlinson 
Beth Buerbaum 
Louise Harrison 

1923 
Elizabeth Etheridge 
, Nellie Moye 
Charlotte Ruth Sumrell 

1924 
Mary Etheridge 
Martha Harrison 
Eloise Bowers 
Ruby Crockett 



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[Page One Hundred Twenty-five] 







The Wrcmcjlers 



J J 'S one scans the activities of college life lie sees societies and clubs galore 
T_ l_ — having various aims and purposes in view. However, the club known 
as the "Wranglers" is the one mi which our present interest centers. It is 
composed of the members of an English class whose sole purpose is to become 
efficient in the art of debate and the use of parliamentary law. Although initiated 
by our instructor, Professor Grim, its success has been due in a great measure 
to the hearty cooperation of the students. 

This (dub is unusual in several respects. Although a certain continuity of 
organization persists in the heritage of ideals, traditions and name, each class 
effects a new organization adopting its own constitution and by-laws. Its officers 
are elected anew every two weeks. The present group is the third to obtain 
membership in the Wranglers. 

This organization is of permanent value in spite of its frequent change of 
executive power. Each member has the high privilege of becoming President. 
However, privileges always imply responsibilities. The responsibility (of course 
a pleasant one!) in this instance is the presentation of an Inaugural Address by 
the newly-elected President, usually setting forth the aims of his administration. 

The primary function of the business meetings is to train our members in the 
actual practice of Parliamentary Law. Robert's "Rules of Order" is the guide 
and authority for conducting all meetings. In this phase of its work the 
Wranglers Club has made a distinct contribution to the life of the students. Mock 
business meetings are full of enthusiasm and excitment as various members try 
to make maneuvers which display their knowledge of Parliamentary Law. 

Another important phase of the work is that of debating. These debates are 
not superficial surveys of frivolous magazine articles, but serious investigations of 
problems of both national and international interest. Vital questions are discussed 
by broad-minded, intelligent men and women who are striving to become capable 
leaders in the solution of these world problems. 

No one enters this organization without obtaining both cultural and intellectual 
values from it. Ten years from today no doubt, many of the prominent lawyers, 
orators, statesmen, teachers, and ministers throughout our nation will be able to 
trace the beginning of their career to their experience in the Wranglers Club of 
A. C. C. 

Ruth Skinner 






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[Page One Hundred Twenty six] 



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The Wranglers 



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F. P. GrIm Adviser 



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embers 



Rachel Bishop 
Timothy Bowen 
Elizabeth Etheridge 
Pakron Gallop 
Everett Harris 
Milton Moye 



Louis Mayo 
Mary S. Richardson 
Archie Reel 
Ruth Skinner 
J. Arther Taylor 
Della Winstead 



Lewis Whitehead 






[Page One Hundred Twenty seven] 






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Colors- Black and Red 



D. D. Club 



Flower: Red Poppy 



Motto: "Wear a Rainbow Around Your Troubles" 

.YELL! 
.A-Rah! A-Rah! A-Ree! 
We're nifty, don't you see! 
We may raise a fuss, 
But loyal — that's us. 
We're the D. D.'s of A. C. C. 



Members 

Annie Ruth Jones. "Sleeping D. D." Reba Stubbs, "Flirting D. D." 

Rachel Bishop, '-Aggravating D. D." Mary Jones, "Smiling D. D." 

Elizabeth Etheridge, "Talking D. D." Viola Freeman, -Dancing D. D.' 
Amanda Ross, "Teasing D. D." Ruby Crockett, "Eating D. D." 

Ei.oise Bowers, "Sentimental D. D." 

Linda Clanton, "Playing D. D." 

Mary Etheridge, "Laughing D. D." 

Martha Harrison, "Loving D. D." 



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[Page One Hundbed Twenty eight] 



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A-l Club 



Colors: Green and White Flower: White Rose 

Motto: "First, Last and Always" 

YELL! 

Rack-a-ehick-a-Boom! 

Rack-a-chick-a-Boom ! 

Rick-a-chick-a! Rack-a-chiek-a! 

Boom! Boom! Boom! 

Rip! Rah! Ree! 

Rip! Rah! Ree! 

A No. l's. A. No. Is 

"A. C. C." 

Mary Alice Smith President Mae Stancill. . .Secretary and Treasurer 



Club Members 

Mae Stancill Mae Reel 

Eunice Highsmith Mary Alice Smith 

Edna Wood 



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[Page One Hundred Twenty nine! 









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"Happu Four Club" 



Flower: Bntchelor Button Colors: Purple am! White 

Motto: "Lizzie, Look Before You Leap" 

Members 

Viola Freeman 



Reba Stubbs 



Mary Etheridge 



Edna Wood 






[Page One Hundred Thirtt] 




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Polyglot Club 



Park Nunn President 

Ruby Crockett Secretary-Treasurer 

Motto: "Autant rle langues, tant de vies" 



Members 



Laura J. Bea< h 

Charles Bali.ou 
Margarkt Collins 
Manuel Castellanos 
Ruby Crockktt 
Annie Harper 
Mart Harper 
Esther A. Humphreys 
John W. Humphreys 
Mary Sue King 



Cecil R. Lee 
J an ie Manning 
Ava Grey Mewborn 
Macon Moore 
Park Nunn 
Agnes Peele 
Mae Reel 
George Sumrell 
John Turnage 
Harvey Underwood 



Elsie Winstead 



[Page One Hundred Thiety-one] 






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"Bi-Chem-Club" 

Bonner Jefferson President 

Park Nunn Vice-President 

Nannie Pearl Quinerly ' Secretary and Treasurer 

Joseph L. McEwen Adviser 

Members 

Reuben Banks Willia Lusby 
Elizabeth Bass Joseph L. McEwen 
Alberta Bass Park Nunn 
Lucille Bayxes Lyma Patrick 
Timothy' Bowen Dillon Peele 
Parron Gallop Royall Philpott 
Vivian Griffin Nannie Pearl Quinerly 
LeRoy Harriss Walter Randolph 
Martha Harrison Hugh Ross. Jr. 
Annie Harper Paul Southard 
Charles James George Sumrell 
Bonner Jefferson Gladys Whitley- 
Cecil Lee John Winfield 

[Pace One Hundred Thirty-two] 




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Wilson Comihj Clul 



Charlie Grey Raulen President 

Hugh H. Ross Secretary and Treasurer 



Roll 



Margaret Ashford 
Ai.isekta Bass 
Elizabeth Bass 
Sarah Barker 
Fearl Barker 
Norman Barnes 
Bert Bateman 
Charles Ballou 
Mary Btjndy 
Agnes Cobb 
Louise Farmer 
Vivian Griffin 
Mary Harper 
Allie High 
Eunice Higiismitii 
Caroline Johnston 
Gladys Johnson 
Nellie Little 



Wahe Lucas 
Ava Grey Mewborn 
William Matthews 
Willari) Moss 
Mamie Mercer 
Catherine Overman 
Charlie Grey Raulen 
Hugh Ross 

PATTIE Rl'FFIN 

Cora Smith 
Marjorie Smith 
Catherine Tucker 
Charlie Moore Walker 
Esther Walls 
Elizabeth Walls 
Elsie Winstead 
Mittie Wiggins 
Lill Winstead 



[ Pa<;e One Hundred Thirty-three! 



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Members 

Laura J. Beach 

Bertha Louise Ashworth. 



Native Heath 

. ."The Nutmeg State' 
.-The Palmetto Stale' 



Annie Kate Oakley "The Cracker State 

Elizabeth Etheridge "The Old Dominion 

Mary Etheridge "The Old Dominion' 

Mary Sue King "The Y allerhammer State' 

E. L. Finley "The Bayou State' 

Willia F. Li'sby' "The Blue Grass State' 

Mrs. J. W. Humphreys "The Gopher Stale' 

J. "W. Humphreys "The Everglade State' 

Mrs. A. K. Moore "The Cracker State' 

Eloise Bowers "The Cracker Slate' 

Linda Clanton "The Cracker Slate' 

Ivy May Smith "The Hoosier State' 

S. C. Taylor, Jr "The Everglade State' 

Leo Weatherly "The Palmetto State' 

W. E. Wilson "The Yallerhammer State' 

H. S. Hilley "77a 1 Cracker State' 

Manuel Castellanos "Columbia, S. A.' 



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I Page One Hundred Thirty four | 



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"Furriners" Club 

Motto: "See A. C. C. First" Flower: The Coliard 

Officers 

Willia F. Ltjsby President 

Mary Sue King Secretary-Treasurer 

YELL ! 

Who are we? 

Who are we? 

"Furriners"! "Furriners"! 

A. C. C. 

We are happy 

Let us say; 

We're the best 

U. S. A. 






[Page One Hundred Thirty five] 




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Pitt County Club 

Flower: Violet . . Colors: Black anil Gold 

Motto: "Keep on the Sunny Side" 

Mary Alice Smith President 

Moses Move Vice-President 

Lons Mayo Secretary ami Treasurer 

Members 

Milton Moye Nannie Pearl Quineri.y 
Moses Moye John Turnage 
DeWitte Speir Bruce Alexander 
Mary - Jones Allen Johnson- 
Louis Mayo Mary Alice Smith 
Ruth Skinner Royce Pierce 
LeRoy Harriss Martha Congleton 
Annie Ruth Jones 

[Pake One Hundred Thirty-sis] 






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Beaufort County Club 



Roll 









Viola Freeman . . 








Edna Wood 


Gladys Whitley 




Walter B. F. Randolph 


Cai.lie Harris 




Harold Whiti.ky 


Lyma Patrick 




Rachel Bishop 


Timothy Bowen 




Mae Stancili. 


John Winfield 



C. Bonner Jefferson 



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[Page Oku Hundred Thirty-seven] 



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Flow.br: Carnation 



Commercial Club 



Colors: Crimson ami White 



Motto: "Be Efficient" 



Sadie Greene 
Agnes Peble 
Catherine Tucker 
Ernest Taylor 
Sarah Barker 

MlTTIE TADLOCK 
WlLLARD MOSS 

Irving Finch 



Roll 



Allie High 
Cora Smith 
William Matthews 
Gladys Johnson 
Manuel Castellanos 
Catherine Overman 
Mary Bund? 
Nellie Little 



Pearl Barker 



[Pace One Hundred Thirty right | 




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[Page One Hundred Thirty nine] 






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ATHLETIC 5NAP5 



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[Page One Hundred Forty] 



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Who's Who at A. C. C. 

Handsomest man Professor McEwen 

Most popular girl Viola Freeman 

Most dignified Senior Sadie Greene 

Most constant talker Mary S. Richardson 

Quietest student Lucretia Henderson 

Most popular with faculty John W. Humphreys 

Sportiest sport John W infield 

Cutest girl Mae, Reel 

Biggest ladies' man Bonner Jefferson 

Best boy athelete Archie Reel 

Laziest boy Harold Wh itley 

Most intensive courters Sam and Martha, Moses and Elizabeth 

Best natured girl Janie Manning 

Biggest loafer Charles Ballou 

Most bashful lad Charles James 

Biggest book-worm Everett Harris 

Freshest freshman Wade Waters 

Most accommodating student Charlie Grey Raulen 

Most popular boy DeWitte Speir 

Fattest girl Amanda Ross 

Thinnest girl Catherine Tucker 

Prettiest boy Bruce Alexander 

"Wittiest man Olin E. Fox 

Sweetest girl Mary Alice Smith 

Biggest vamps Bunk, Reha, Viola and Edna 

Most sentimental student Lyma Patrick 

Biggest heart-breaker Cecil Lee 

Most religious Milton Moye 

Biggest bluff Eloise Bowers 

Most devoted lover Richard Rouse 

Happiest student Lucille Baynes 

Biggest eater James Lawson 

Biggest dude _ anuel Castellanos 

Biggest feet Samuel Taylor 

Best singers Rachel Bishop, Moses Moye 

Best society "fans" Lill W instead, Park Nunn 

Most cultured student Delia W instead 

Most graceful student Lewis Whitehead 



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[Page One Hundred Fortt-one] 




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Name 


Favorite Expression 


Characteristic Occupation 


Favorite Song 


Bishop 


' 'You're Craiy" 


Dating 


"Honey, Don't You Worry ' 


Ballou 


"Oli good gracious!" 


Trying to keep thin 


"Oh How I Hate to Get Up 
in the Morning" 


Etheridge 


" Lawsie me!" 


Buying Hope Chest 


"Oh Me! Oh My!" 


Jones 


"What ?" 


Sleeping 


"0, Gee! Gosh! O Gollie 
I'm in Love" 


Mrs. Henderson 


" I don't "no" 


Writing term papers 


"Work, For the Night is 
Coming." 


Greene 


"Oh, pshaw!" 


Writing to LeRoy Harris 


"An Old Fashioned Home" 


Lusby 


" I'm so 'tard!" 


Working on t he " Pine Knot" 


" My Old Kentucky Home" 


\V instead 


"You know not" 


Playing piano 


"I Love You Truly" 


Oakley 


"Oh! I know" 


Work at the store 


"Marching Thru' Georgia" 


Ross 


"Don't you know' " 


Trying to get fat 


" When You and I Were Young 
Maggie" 


Mrs. Richardson 


"Now wait a minute — " 


Teaching school 


" Blest Be the Tie That Binds" 


Jefferson 


"Oh, wait a minute! — Let me 
tell you" 


Practicing? in the Voice Studio 


"I Love You" 


Fox 


" You — know" 


Going to school 


"Hail! Hail! The Gang's All 
Here" 


Henderson 


"A spotted cow and a milk 
pail" 


Expounding The Word 


"Old Black Joe" 


Whitehead 


"Big Boy" 


Telling jokes 


"And Her Name was Lucille" 


Bowen 


"I'll declare" 


Meeting all of his appoint- 
ments if not forgotten 


"Call Me Back, Pal 0' Mine" 


Taylor 


"Just one question Prof." 


Rocking the baby 


"God will Take Care of You" 


Moye 


"It's not so" 


Going up town 


"As Long as The World Rolls 
On" 


Reel 


"Now, it is just this way — " 


Playing football 


"Three O'clock in the Morn- 
ing" 


Humphreys 


"Well" 


Advising 


"A Perfect Day" 











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[Page One Hundred Forty-four] 







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Chart 



m 



Virtue 


Vice 


Ambition 


Likely To Be 


Affection 


Chewing gum 


To marry 


Mrs. Rouse 


Cheerfulness 


Talking in chapel 


To teach 


A Poet 


Enthusiasm for Y. W, C. A. 


Biting her lips 


To live in Farmvillc 


An old maid school teacher 


Friendliness 


Skipping breakfast 


To be a sociable school teacher 


A housekeeper 


Reading 


Studying on Sunday 


Musical fame 


A Domestic Expert 


Patience 


Playing cards 


To enter politics 


A sport's wife 


Social adaptation 


"Sassin" teachers 


To visit the forty eight capi- 
tols of the United States 


Preacher's secretary 


Dislike for flirting 


Quarreling 


To become a composer of 
music 


A preacher's wife 


Love for Mrs. Moore 


Sitting up late 


To teach Home Economics 


' His" cook 


Truthfulness 


Skipping Biology 
Lab. 


To have a home of her own 


A boarder 


Piety 


Arguing 


To be a leader in religious 
affairs 


What she is 


Sincerity 


Curling his hair 


To find a girl he loves 


A singing Evangelist 


Ambitious 


Being late for class 


To be Mr. Kilpatrick's co- 
worker 


Bald-headed 


Inability to catch trains 


Picking his eye brows 


To be a Billy Sunday 


A dairyman 


Studiousness 


Sleeping on class 


To be a Policeman 


Married 


Leading in prayer 


Smoking a pipe 


To sing 


Thought of sometime 


Good nature 


Arguing in class 


To become a statesman 


A circuit rider 


Keeping a date 


Flirting 


To work for two 


Single 


Keeping late hours 


Eating like an Old 
Maid 


To be a Philosopher 


A Professor 


Knowledge 


Twisting his mustache 


To preach 


A politician 



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[Page One Hundred Forty-five] 



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[Page One Hundred Forty-six] 



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[Page One Hundred Forty-seven] 



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Seven Wonders of A. C. C. 



1. Wonder where Mr. Humphreys gets so many big words. 

2. Wonder what, happens when the teachers leave the room. 

3. Wonder what happens the night before Exams. 

4. Wonder why the boys are such teases. 

5. Wonder how the girls find out all that happens. 

6. Wonder what the boys find to talk to the girls about so often. 

7. Wonder why everyone is so quiet in the library when Miss Myrtle's footsteps 

are heard. 

^t 

George Conekin : "Is it possible to confide a secret to you ? 
Ernest Taylor : "Certainly ; I will be as silent as the grave." 
George: "Well, then, I have a pressing need for two bucks." 
Ernest : "Do not worry. It is as if I had heard nothing." 

J* 

Professor: "When did the revival of learning begin?" 
Weary Student : "Just before exams." 

Evidence 

"He told the shy maid of his love, 
The color left her cheeks 
But on the .shoulder of his coat 
It showed for several weeks." 

Si 

The trouble with the modern girl is that she doesn't know what she wants but 
she is determined to get it. 

"Nowadays," said the modern optimist, "where there's smoke, there's a still." 



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[Paue One Hundred Forty-eight] 













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IOKLY knew she came and went — Powe 
Like troutlets in a pool ; — Hood. 
She was a phantom of delight — Wordsworth. 
And I was like a fool. — Eastman. 



One kiss, dear maid, I said and sighed — Coleridge. 

Out of those lips unshorn — Longfellow. 
She shook her ringlets 'round her head — Stoddard. 

And laughed in merry scorn. — Tennyson. 

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky. — Tennyson. 

You heard them, O my heart? — Alice Carry. 
'Tis twelve at night by the castle clock — Coleridge. 

Beloved, we must part. — Alice Carry. 

Come back, come back, she cried in grief — Campbell. 

My eyes are dim with tears, — Taylor. 
How shall I live through all the days, — Osgood. 

All through a hundred years? — Perry. 

'Twas in the prime of summer time — Hood. 

She blessed me with her hand. — Hoyt. 
We strayed together, deeply blest, — Edwards. 

Into the dreaming land. — Cornwall. 

The laughing bridal roses blow, — Patmore. 

To dress her dark-brown hair. — Taylor. 
My heart is breaking with my woe, — Tennyson. 

Most beautiful ! Most rare. — Read. 

I clasped it on her sweet, cold hand, — Browning. 

The precious golden link, — Smith 
I calmed her fears and she was calm. — Coleridge. 

Drink, pretty creature, drink. — Wordsworth. 

And so I won my Genevieve, — Coleridge. 

And walked in Paradise : — Hervey. 
The fairest thing that ever grew — Wordsworth. 

Between me and the skies. — Osgood. 

— Anonymous 



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[Pace One Hundred Forty nine] 




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Jokes 



Barber: "Shave and hair cut, sir? 
Randolph: "Naw, brush my teeth." 

There are three classes of women — the intellectual, the beautiful, and the 
majority. 

,* 

Prof. Wilson : "Do you drink liquor?" 

Prof. McEwen : "What do you //>/'/(/,■ 1 do with it?" 

Si 

Miss Fannie, if a herring and a half cost a cent and a half, and it takes three 
sheets of water to make an overcoat for a codfish while a one eyed mackerel is 
swimming to the bottom of a barrel of soft soap, bow long will it take a crawfish 
to kick a lobster full of jelly fish? 

.< 

Amanda: "I'll never get over what I saw last night." 
Haydie: "What's that?" 
Amanda : "The moon." 

■ < 

Jim: "I didn't put any one o'clock class on my schedule. I don't like to go 
to class after eating a full meal." 

Jam : "That don't bother me. I eat up here at the College." 

..< 

Freshman: "Only fools are positive." 
Seniok : "Are you sure?" 
Freshman : "Positive!" 






Late Caller: "Do you like progressive men?" 

A. C. C. Co-ed: "Yes; one with lots of 'get-up and go'. 

Soph: "Say, did you ever take chloroform?" 
Fresh.: "Xaw, what hour does it come?" 



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Tim Bowen (Selling Bibles to a lady) : "Madam, can you tell me a road not 
traveled by Bible agents?" 

The Lady : "Yes, Mr., the road to Heaven." 

.,* 

Prof. Hilley : "I hear you are in the dairy business." 

Otto : "Yes, but the question is now, if we feed this cow soap will she give 
shaving cream?" 



Everett : "Will you share my lot ?" 
Della : "What sort of bouse is on it ?" 

J* 

Mary Etheridge : "How does Moses make love? DeWitte doesn't know how." 
Elizabeth : "Well, until T knew him I thought all the perfect lovers were on 
the screen." 



Sadie : "Always love your teachers." 
Bonner: "I tried that once but she got mad." 



Definitions 

LAUGH — The funny noise a woman makes when she is embarrassed. 

FRANKNESS — A woman of twenty-seven admitting she's nineteen. 

WIT — The funny things you say after the guests have gone. 

SWEETHEART— The one you think you can not live without. 

WIFE — Someone you think you cannot live with. 

THOUGHTFUL HUSBAND— One who, when he comes home late, gets in 
bed backwards, so if his wife wakes up he can explain that lie was just getting up. 



Miss Peele : "Now, I put the number seven cm the hoard, what number imme- 
diately comes to your mind?" 
Barnhill : "Eleven." 



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[Page One Hundred Fiftt-oneJ 






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Questions the Staff Hears Every Day 

"How soon is the Pine Knot going to be out?" 

"Are you going to have a good joke section ?" 

"Won't you be glad when the work's all over?" 

"I don't see how you do it. Can't I help out in some way? I'll have an hour 
or so to spare sometime next week." 

"The eopy I handed in at first was all wrong. Is it too late to change it?" 



What Happened at A. C. C. 

It was just after eight 

The young spoon er teas late 

And she kept working tier thumb; 

Her nerves were a-lhrill, 

She couldn't keep still, 

(111, ir//i/. oh why don't he come'.' 

Sited rush to her room 

For a foiicli of perfume 

Or lo straighten a lock gone awry — 

Then she'd pick up a booh, 

(lire a glance or a look, 

When hind,- down the stairs she would fly. 

II was a feir mi miles past 

When al last, and at last 

lie finally came into the hall — 

From the stairway she stud. 

As she blushed rosy-red, 

"I forgot you were coining al all!" 



[Paoe One Hundred Fifty-two] 



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College Calendar 



SEPTEMBER 

10 — The A. C. L., Norfolk Southern, and jitney lines do rushing business. Xo wonder I So many 
Freshmen who are afraid they won't get to A. C. C. in time to matriculate. 

12 — Convocation sermon by Mr. Grim. Nine months of hard work announced. 

13 — Classes begin. 

14 — Christian church reception in honor of college students. Speeches, songs, ice cream and cake I 

15 — Old girls "At Home" to new girls. The new students initiated into the mysteries of the upper 
Classmen. 

16 — A dignified march to Sunday School and Church. 

17 — "Freshies" accompanied to town for the first time. 

19 — Homesick girls shed a few tears and wander back to childhood days. 

21 — President's reception. "Something to eat besides cooked tomatoes aud peas." 

24 — First meeting of the Literary Societies. 

28 — Y. W. hike — "No one returned hungry." 

OCTOBER 

1 — Organization of the Ensemble Club. 

4 — Mrs. Moore reads the "regulations." Groans. 

6 — Reception of the Hesperian Literary Society in honor of new students. 

7 — Ice cream for dinner I 
10 — We learn how to smile at A. C. C. at our test papers, but resolve to do better. 
12 — D. D. Club initiation. Curious costumes seen on the campus that day. 
13 — Alethian Literary Society reception for new students, Dramatic Club Room. 
15 — "Decision" night for the societies — Much excitement and rejoicing over new members. 
23 — First regular meeting of the Ensemble Club. 
24 — Hallowe'en party. "Students and faculty look their spookiest." 

NOVEMBER 

1 — Mr. Hilley conducts chapel. Counsels us in regard to our attitude toward work. 

2 — Big football game, A. C. C. versus Oak Ridge. A. C. C. loses gracefully. 

3 — Circus in town. Half holiday. Even the faculty excited. 

6 — Mrs. Moore serves cocoa in Dramatic Club Room at 9:30 P.M., and reminds girls of the regulations. 
17 — Dates once again. "As usual just from 8:00 o'clock until 9:30." 
23 — Fair day. "Red lemonade, pop corn, merry-go-round." 
28 — The day before Thanksgiving. "One day only." 
29 — Thankful for many things, especially our good dinner. 

DECEMBER 

1 — New month begins. "Oh, the joy in the anticipation of Christmas I" 

3 — Semi- weekly dessert — apricots. 

6 — Icicles hanging on radiators. "Why is A. C. C. like the North Pole?" 
10 — Musical program in auditorium. 
12 — Christmas party of the Ensemble Club. 
14 — Play, "The Kleptomaniac" presented by Dramatic Club. 
15 — Christmas Cantata, presented by the School of Music. 

17 — Fifth Annual Christmas party of the Dramatic Club. "A thing of beauty is a joy forever I" 
19 — Joint program of the Hesperian and the Alethian Societies. 
20 — "A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year." 

JANUARY 

7 — Most of us return, a few bringing some unbroken New Year's resolutions. 

8 — Classes. Nobody prepared. "We wants to go home to our muversl" 
11 — Cow liver for supper. Our regular dish on Friday evenings. 
14 — Debaters chosen for the inter-society debate. 
20 — Dull, drizzling, darkened Sunday with one sunbeam: Sign on the bulletin board, "The girls are not 

required to attend church this morning." "Every cloud has a silver lining." 
22 — Cramming for "exams." 
23-26 — "Exams." Weighed in the balances and found wanting. God must have loved "flunkers." He 

made so many of them. 
29-31 — Our pictures taken for College Annual. Compelled to look our best for two days. 



iMNiiiinr im 



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[Page One Hundred Fifty three] 





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p„„„„„ """'""'"' 



COLLEGE CALENDAR— (Continued) 






FEBRUARY 

1 — Began the hist mile of the race with resolutions to do better. 

3 — Callie Sitterson and Royce renew their "case" under the watchful eyes of Mrs. Moore. 

5 — Tim Bowen announces meeting of. Fellowship Club. "Everybody urged to be present." 

— Glee Club, and Expression pupils present a joint program in Farmville. 
10 — Semi-annual music recital. 

11-15 — Beginning of the evangelistic meetings: conducted by Mr. J. Boyd Jones of AshevMle. 
20 — An Armenian gentleman speaks in chapel on the advantages of living in America. 
22 — A Dramatic Club Program. Dramatic interpretation of "Peg O' My Heart," by Charlie Grey 

Raulen, followed by play, "Miss Doulton's Orchids." 
23 — Manuel, our student from South America speaks in chapel. Tells us of bis state, Columbia. 
27— Snow I 
29 — Cow liver sandwiches for supper. Mmm ! mmm I 



MARCH 

2 — Purchase of spring .gowns and bonnets. Unusual anxiety to attend church. 

3 — Annual staff rushed with its momentous task. 

4-6 — Days of tests. "Oh what pests I" 

8 — Moses and Elizabeth depart for Oak City to spend week-end with "Sister Nelle." 

9 — Chicken for dinner. "How extravagant !" 
12 — Mr. Pearce escorts girls on a five-mile "hike." 
13 — "Red" Brookbank announces prayer meeting at seven P.M. "Everybody please come — I'm going 

to lead." 
14 — Ice cream for dinner. 

17 — Inter-Society debate. "Pep, colors, yells — hurrah I hurrah ! for Hes-Alethians I" 
20 — The college Dramatic Club presents the "Kleptomanic" in Kenly High School. 
21 — The college Dramatic Club gives an entertainment at the New Hope School. 
22 — Piano and Voice recital. Main feature, chorus by Glee Club. 
27 — Recital — Dramatic interpretation of play, "Within the Law" — Sadie Greene. 
29 — Opening of baseball season. A. C. 0. plays Wake Forest at Wake Forest. 



What next? 



APRIL 

1 — Mr. Grim excuses Education classes. "April Fool." 

2 — Elsie Winstead receives letter and telegram from Chapel Hi' 

3 — Spring is here — oft' to the woods we hike. 

4 — Rachel and Dick reach perfect understanding. "In the sprin 
to thoughts of love." 

6 — Installation Service of the Y. W. C. A. 
13 — Work — Groaning under the heavy burden. 

15 — Tennis, the sport. "Annie Ruth and Milton play love set." 
16 — Education note books duel "Oh! Why take the joy out of living." 
1 7 — April showers — bring "Mae" flowers. 
18 — Going home for Easter holidays. "Everybody happy." 
21 — Boys leave for western baseball trip. 

22 — Back from the Easter holidays for the last round. "Don't die on third I" 
25 — Junior-Senior reception. 
26 — Date night comes again. "Couples joyfully journey to auditorium." 



young man's fancy lightly turns 



MAY 
1 — Examinations drawing near. 

4 — Practicing for commencement. "No rest for the weary." 
13 — Ham-Ramsey revival begins. Students attend in large numbers. 
19 — Examination time almost here. "Electric light bill increases." 
22 — Exams begin. 

24 — Exams end. "Some glad, some sad, and a few mad." 

24 — Saturday evening. Inter-society program. First feature of commencement. 
25 — Sunday. Baccalaureate sermon by Dr. L. O. Bricker of Atlanta, Ga. Y. W. C. A. Vesper service. 

Sunday evening. Sermon for High School graduates. 
«G — High School Class Day Exercises. High School Commencement Exercises. Grand Concert by School 

of Music. 
27 Tuesday. College Class Day Exercises. Baseball game at League Park. Commencement Play, 

"Daddy Long-Legs," presented by College Dramatic Club. 
2H Wednesday. College Commencement; literary address by Dr. Chase, President of University of North 

Carolina. Alumni Banquet at Cherry Hotel. 

Homeward bound. 






I'lllllUIHIMH 






[Page One Hundred Fifty-four 1 



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Our Advertisers have 

made this book 

what it is. 

Patronize 

them for they 

have patronized us! 

Everett J. Harris, 

Business Manager 

Ruth Skinner, 
Assistant 



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State's Finest 

FOOD STORE 



A. B. C. Bread and all Bakery 
Products 

CARROLL'S TEH ROOM 

Attr active and Economical 




No. 109-111 Coldshoro Street 
Phone 172 Phone 415 

WE WANT YOUR TRADE ' 

If Good, Reliable Goods, Low- ! 

est Possible Prices, Fair and 

Square Dealing, Polite Atten- . 

tion. Will Get it, we can count j 

on you for a Customer. i 

1 
\ 



Ava Grey: Have you ever been pinched for going too fast' 
Ray McIlwean : No, but I have been pinched. 



BARNES-HARRELL CO. 



WHOLESALE GROCERIES 

WILSON, N. C. 




Bottlers 
Coca-Cola 

and 

Cherry Blossom 

Bottled With 
Deep Well Water 



Distributors 

Saginaw Self Rising 

and 

Upper Crust 

Plain Flour 

DIAMOND TIRES 
Western Gun Shells 



prtggg Hotel 



WILSON, N. C. 



EUROPEAN 

IN THE HEART OF 
THE CITY 



A. W. PATE 

PROP. 



Churchwell s j 

"The Quality Shop" \ 






Agent Jor 




( 



i 

Prof. Wilson: From Australia we get the word Tapioca; from Germany we get 
medicine; from Canada we get — 
Bonner: Bad liquor. 



M LLBR' 




I 

I Phone 127 

I 

I 



PHARMACISTS 



WILSON, N. C. 



Phone 128 



GOTO 



Denny 

Bros. 

Co. 

WILSON'S DEPENDABLE 

Jetoelers anb 
(Optometrists 



! Correct 



j DR. E. B. HARBOUR j 



| In charge of eye department i 



IVearing 
Apparel 

For Women and Misses 

Millinery and 
Furnishings 



I j Barrett -Patrick j 



Company 



j Hackney Bldg. Nash Slrce \ 

j WILSON, N. C. j 



Roosevelt had Rough Riders and became president. How about Ford? 



I a 



^ranzlt Ranking St Cntsf (!!#♦ 



CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS 



$560,000.00 

■ ! 

Per . . A Per ' 

q Paid on Savings Deposits y> q j 



4 



WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Golden 
Gem 



The Fertilizer that 
produces tobacco 
of texture, color 
and weight. 

Manufactured by 

Farmers Cotton 
Oil Co. 

Wilson, North Carolina 



"Say it WitA 



Jt 



ft 



oiuers 




Flowers delivered by wire lo any 
address in the U. S. or Canada 
in a few hours lime 



Mrs. Grim: How old is a person who was born in 1S94? 
Elizabeth Etheredge: Man or woman? 



carolina 
Laundry 

Phone 370 

Dry Cleaners 

Pressers 

Launderers 

YOUR 

PATRONAGE 

SOLICITED 

Wilson, North Carolina 



Courtesy 
Service 



Results 



i 

SELL YOUR TOBACCO j 

WITH l!; 

Ferrell | 

JVarehouse Co. \ 

Wilson, N. C. I 



Atlantic 
Cfjrtsittan College 



A Standard Co-educational College 




Invites serious minded young men and 

young women, graduates of High 

Schools, and advanced College 

Students, to enter its courses 

and enjoy its fellowship 

For Information Address 

THE PRESIDENT 

Wilson, N. C. 



! 
i 
i 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 



Norfolk Southern Railroad operates unexcelled service between Ra- 



leigh, Goldsboro and intermediate points in eastern North Carolina. Pull- 
man drawing room sleeping cars are operated between Raleigh and Nor- ] 
folk, serving the following principal stations, viz: Wendell, Zebulon, 
Wilson, Farmville, Greenville, Washington. Pinetown, Plymouth, Edenton, 
Hertford, Elizabeth City, Moyock, making connections with other lines 
at Norfolk, Raleigh and Wilson. 



Pullman buffet parlor cars and drawing room sleeping cars are 
operated between New Bern and Norfolk, serving the following principal ! 

stations,, viz: Vanceboro, Washington, Pinetown, Plymouth, Mackeys, 
Edenton, Hertford, Elizabeth City, Moyock and intermediate stations, 
making connections at New Bern for Goldsboro, Beaufort and interme- 
diate points; connecting at Norfolk with all connecting lines. 

Low rate summer excursion, week end and Sunday excursion fares 
are available during the summer season to Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Eliza- 
beth City, Nags Head, Morehead City, Beaufort, Jackson Springs, Aqua- 
dale, Norwood I for Rocky River Springs). 

For fares, Pullman reservations and any other information, call on 
any Norfolk Southern ticket agent or apply to 

J. F. DA ETON, 

General Passenger Agent, 
Norfolk, Va. 



Efirds 

JVilson''s Busiest 

Department 

Store 



3L 1 1 

Buys it for Less j 
Sells it for Less | 



G. T. 

FULGHUM 

ST Go. 

Wilson, N. C. 



! i 

i i 



Roofing 

Sheet Metal M^ork j 

Tobacco i 

Flues ! 



Royal Fini.roTT: Red Lee is the most 
Omer: What has he been doing? 
Piiii.pott: He spent all the afternoon 
headed men. 



I Wilson Drug 
j Company 

j £ 

j Drugs 

Toilet Articles 
Stationery 

j Candy 

i 

I Wilson, North Carolina 
I 



altruistic man I ever knew. 

telling hair-raising stories to a couple of bald- 



P. L. 

WOODARDJ 

& COMPANY j 

General j 

jHercf)anbt£e * 



General Agents 

Contentnca (guano Co. 

Telephone 70 
Wilson, North Carolina 



BOYKIN GROCERY CO., Inc. 

....Distributors of... 

ROLLER CHAMPION FLOUR 

BLUE LABEL CANNED GOODS 

GELFAND'S MAYONNAISE and RELISHES 
CORNO and FULL-O-PEP FEEDS 

U. M. C. GUN SHELLS and NAILS 



! Wil 



son 



North Carolina 



Royce: If you know a thing is wrong, Callie, why do you do it^ 
Callie: Just to see if I am right. 



| The SOUTHERN 

I COTTON OIL 

COMPANY 
I 

I Manufacturers 
\ 

\ COTTON SEED 

" PRODUCTS 

I High-Grade 

\ FERTILIZERS 

i 

I 

j Wilson, North Crrolina 
I 



WILSON 

HARDWARE 
COMPANY 

Leaders in 

HARDWARE 

Building Materials 

and 

Sporting Goods 

NASH TELEPHONE 

ST. 18 and 19 

Goldsboro Street 
Phone 289 

WILSON, N.C. 




k^ 



No. 306— CLOSED SCHOOL BUS BODY 

Mounted on Ford One-ton Chassis 

Specifications — Length, 12' (>" — Width, 60" — Height, Inside, 56" 

This Is a Metal Panel Body with Hardwood Frame 

Rigidly braced, and built by thoroughly experienced 
mechanics, who bave been building 
Bus Bodies for years 

Painting Brewster Green with appropriate striping. 

Trimmed with best quality mule skin. Equipped 

with drop sash, as illustrated in cut. 

It is provided with front and 

rear door controls, 

operated from 

the driver's 

seat 

For all-year-round transportation of school children 
this body is most ideal in every way. Has a com- 
fortable seating capacity for twenty-tive children. 

Manufactured by 

HACKNEY BROTHERS 

Wilson, North Carolina 



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Autographs 



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I J. T. 

I DEW & BRO. 

Manufacturers of and 
Dealers in 

t Yellow Pine, Flooring, Ceiling, 
i Siding, Shingles, Brick, Lime 
| Doors and Blinds, Laths : : : : 

FRAMING CUT to ORDER 



! 

{ WOOD 



COAL 



p , j 300 

Phone g24 



Wilson, North Carolina 



...THE.. 

Planters 



! 



Warehouse ! 

WILSON, N, C. 
Sell Your Tobacco Here 

BEST PPJCES 
FAIRTKEATMENT j 

B. T. Smith John B Bruton j 

Managers * 

E B. Capps 

President 



Charles James: What do you think of a fellow that goes horseback riding at mid- 
night and rides all night? 

Prof. Wilson: I should think he was crazy. Who did that? 
Charles: Paul Revere. 



SERVICE SHAVING PARLOR G0LDSB0R0 



STREET j 



M; 



COLEY- TAYLOR. Proprietors 



COURTEOUS BARBERS AT YOUR SERVICE 



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CHILDREN'S HAIR CUTTING A SPECIALTY YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED j 

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Autographs 



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Everybody 

in Eastern North 

Carolina knows 

It pays to 

deal 



i i 



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Better Fiiilliif 



i 

j SERVICE AND QUALITY 
OUR MOTTO: 



Telephone 58 



Wilson, N. C. 

FUNERAL DIREG10R AMBULANCE SERVICE 



Martha: Oh, I wonder where is my Sambo! Have any of you girls seen him'i 
Sam Taylor: Oh Marfe, here is your Sambo. 



J. w. 
RILEY & CO. i 



Deals 



Heavy and Fancy | 

Groceries ! 



Telephone j g85 • 

202-204 TARBORO STREET \ 
WILSON, N. C. ! 



1 Carolina's Greatest 

■ Drug Slore 



! 

' Wilson, North Carolina j 

! ! 

I MODERN j 

PRESCRIPTION \ 

SERVICE ' 

Seating capacity for 75 people at f 
one time at our fountain 

Delivery to all parts of the city 

A HEARTY WELCOME 

AWAITS YOU HERE I 



I 



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Autographs 



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KNOWN 
EVERYWHERE 



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I Velvet Kind 



CREAM OF ICE CREAMS 



I 



\ Made in Wilson by \ 

* Chap in Sacks j 
Corporation 



^tteon QTfteatre 

Eastern Carolina's 
Finest 

ROAD SHOWS 
VAUDEVILLE j 
PICTURES ! 






IH. SUSMAN! 



*>« 



COMPANY 



Richmond 



Virginia i 



Specialize in 



i Food Products \ 

For Schools, Colleges and 
Public Institutions 



34 years commercial life 
at your service 



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For.... 


| WILSON SHOE 


Real Estate | 


| STORE 


uf • 

Insurance » 


! Shoes : Hosiery 


Ca// on 

WILSON i 


\ WE FIT THE 
j FEET AT 


INSURANCE j 


\ THE 


REALTY i 




CO. 


! Right Prices 


Established 1908 \ 




Geo. T. Stronach, Sec. ! ^ 
WILSON, N. C. [ 


• WILSON 
i North Carolina 



Finlky: Why don't you get rid of that dog, Otto? 

Otto: I just keep him for sentimental reasons; my wife hates him. 



SELL YOUR TOBACCO AT 

The Watson Warehouse 

WILSON, NORTH CAROLINA 

W. P. Anderson 
S. H. Anderson 
W. M. Carter 

JVilsofi Farmers Union JVarehouse Co. 



TRY US AND WE BELIEVE 
YOU WILL COME AGAIN 



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Autographs 



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Centre Brick Warehouse 

WILSON, N. C. 
Jfor tfje H>ale of Heaf tobacco 



I T 



HE CENTRE BRICK IS THE LEADING 
WAREHOUSE ON THE LARGEST TO- 
BACCO MARKET IN THE WORLD 



COZART, EAGLES Sf CARR 

Owners and Proprietors 



« 



Pkof. Wilson: Talk about American aristocracy! Why, this country was settled by 
crooks, debtors, and men let out of jail. 
Prof. Mattox: Well, I see we all got here. 



»:•■ 



I 



W. M. 

Wiggins & Co. 

Plumbing and 
Heating Contractors 

Hot Water, Steam and Vapor 
Heating Systems 

Telephone 
891 

OFFICE: Fidelity Building 
WILSON, N. C. 



I 



AND 

&WT mm©ip 

iTor Quality 

OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 
FOR THIS ANNUAL 

Wilson, N. C. 



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Autographs 



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SERVICE — QUALITY 



This Annual is 
an example of 
co-operation 
with the 
student body 



r g^fl HE predominating 
%^_ W factor in the produc- 
tion of a high grade annual 
is the complete cooperation 
of the printing organization 
with the student board. 
d^The annual department of 
the Edwards & Broughfon 
Printing Co. offers such co- 
operation from the supervi- 
sion of art work and engrav- 
ings to the completed book. 




Edwards & Broughfon Printing Co. 

Printers — Engravers — Binders 
Raleigh, North Carolina